Home About Archives RSS Feed

Downtown Wildlife

Tammy Daniels

NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — I didn't expect to see wildlife in the midst of the city but there it was — a deer on Main Street.

I was coming in through the, um, "Kmart" parking lot to get the office on Main Street very, very early one morning a couple weeks ago when I spotted a large brown creature out of the corner of my eye.

Nope, wasn't a dog. It was a very confused deer trying to figure out how its internal GPS landed it next to a bank. The deer high tailed it south across the parking lot to Summer Street. Hope it made it back to the green space.

Days later, I ran into another wild inhabitat of the city in same area. This time it was a small brown bunny sitting on the sidewalk on Ashland Street outside the cinemas. A baby from the look of it not long from the nest.

He scurried into the bushes and I scurried to my assignment, hoping he'd look both ways before crossing the street. 

 

     

Alcombright Dedicates City Report To Longtime Clerk

By Andy McKeever

Mayor Richard Alcombright surprised longtime City Clerk Mary Ann Abuisi on Tuesday morning when he announced that the city report is dedicated to her.

 

Abuisi shared stories of her 28 years as city clerk for about an hour Tuesday morning.

NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — When it comes to city records nobody knows them better Mary Ann Abuisi, longtime city clerk.

Now the annual  report will be dedicated to her nearly 30 years overseeing the city's paperwork.

"I think it's wonderful. It's an honor. I've seen many dedications but I never thought it would be me," the retired clerk said after being surprised with the announcement Tuesday morning.

Mayor Richard Alcombright said he was pouring over records for his first report when he made the connection. It was fitting for Abuisi to be honored this way, he said.

Abuisi started as assistant city clerk in 1975 and worked under former Mayors Joseph Bianco, Richard Lamb, John Taft and John Barrett III. She retired in 2003.

"My fondest memories of Mary Ann goes back to my dad," Alcombright, whose father, Daniel Alcombright, was a longtime city councilor, said. "For me this is gratifying. I think my dad would be happy that we are doing this."

Abuisi's husband helped provide a photo and a short biography for the inside page of the annual report and then on Tuesday brought her to the mayor's office without telling her about it. Abuisi sat with Alcombright and members of the press for about an hour reminiscing of her time in City Hall.

The aspect she misses the most of the job is watching people grow. Abuisi, also a justice of the peace, said she would marry a couple, then issue a birth certificate to their baby. Later that child would come to her for various licenses and paperwork and eventually to her for their own wedding.

"It's like you know everybody but they don't know you," Abuisi said. "To watch these people grow. It's a fun thing."

Abuisi married more than 500 couples and is still a justice of the peace until 2013, when she will give up the post.

Alcombright gave Abuisi a hardbound copy of the report with a special note on the inside thanking her for her time.

"The most exciting thing was the elections," Abuisi said. "It's like being the mother of the city."

After making sure all registered voters' information was up to date and in the correct ward, Abuisi would hand-count ballots until the sun came up. The ballots would be tallied at a City Hall that would be packed with people.

Alcombright added that men would be dressed up in suits and smoking cigars while Abuisi would write vote totals on a large chalkboard.

"It was just a different time," Alcombright said.

Abuisi's biggest challenge came in 1979 when the city population dropped and city officials had to drop from 12 to five wards. While officials were perplexed at where those boundaries would be outlined, Abuisi had figured out a way it would work. However, it involved moving Ward 7's voting to Ashland Street, which triggered outrage in the ward's Italian neighborhood near Walnut and Furnace streets.

When the first election was held with the new districts, Abuisi said one of the boxes of supplies randomly fell from the top shelf and she joked it was an old Italian ghost upset with the new districts.

"The biggest change I've noticed is population," Abuisi said. "But I think the city is coming around."

Since retiring, Abuisi has been filling her time with her family and spends time in Florida.

"I'm very, very busy doing nothing," Abuisi said. "Once you retire, you wonder how you ever found time to work."

Abuisi was given a hardbound copy of the report with an inscription from Alcombright on the inside thanking her for her work. The report will be presented to the City Council on June 14, Alcombright said.

Tags: Abuisi, city report      

North Adams Honors Former Tree Commissioner

Tammy Daniels

NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — Alma Benedetti was honored on Friday morning for her many years of making the city beautiful with the planting of a lilac tree at the entrance of Windsor Lake.

The longtime tree commissioner and retired art te