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North Adams Candidate Forums, Debates Scheduled

Staff Reports
iBerkshires
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Please check back as schedules will be added and/or updated through the next few weeks.
 
NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — iBerkshires is hosting a City Council candidate forum on Thursday, Oct. 17, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Mingo's Sports Bar & Grill at Greylock Bowl & Golf. 
 
At least nine candidates have confirmed their attendance at the forum, which will include opening and closing comments and a conversation on city topics. Editor Tammy Daniels will moderate and those in attendance will be able to submit questions in writing as time allows.
 
The forum is open to the public and will be recorded for later broadcast on NBCTV.
 
Candidates running for council are incumbents Lisa Blackmer, Keith Bona, Jennifer Breen and Nancy Bullett and newcomers Eric Buddington, Robert F. Cardimino, Michael J. Hernandez, Benjamin J. LambKate Hanley Merrigan, Joshua J. Moran, David R. Robbins and Wayne J. Wilkinson.
 
The forum is the first of a series of debates and sessions planned for the candidates ahead of the Nov. 5 election.
 
Two debates will be held for mayor between candidates Richard Alcombright, who is running for a third term, and Robert M. Moulton Jr., a local businessman and former city councilor. 
 
The first debate is being sponsored by the Berkshire Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday, Oct. 23, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at McCann Technical School. Local media, including iBerkshires, will ask questions through the moderator of the candidates, who will have two minutes each to respond with opportunity for rebuttal. The public may bring in questions on note cards and, if time permits, some of those questions may be asked. It will also be taped by NBCTV and televised several times before the election.
 
The debate will be business-focused and moderated by Paul Hutchinson, retired Adams town clerk. Questions have been developed by the Berkshire Chamber of Commerce and representatives from the media, including the North Adams Transcript, iBerkshires, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts' student newspaper the Beacon and WNAW.
 
"The Berkshire Chamber is pleased coordinate and host the only public mayoral debate in North Adams this election season," said Michael Supranowicz, president and CEO of the Berkshire Chamber of Commerce. "It is extremely important that the community has a chance to become well informed. We encourage businesses to send representatives from their organizations to this event, as there will be business-specific questions asked."
 
The second mayoral debate will be held at the WNAW radio station for live broadcast on Wednesday, Oct. 30, from 9 to 10. iBerkshires will also participate in this debate with media partner Berkshire News Network as well as in the half-hour morning forums with council candidates to be aired live beginning Thursday, Oct. 24, at 8:30. The radio sessions are usually rebroadcast the weekend prior to the election.
 
The schedule for the radio council forums, as of Oct. 16, are as follows:

• Thursday, Oct 24, 8:30 a.m.: Blackmer and Bona
• Friday, Oct 25, 8 a.m.: Breen and Bullet
• Monday, Oct 28, 8:30 a.m.: Buddington and Cardimino
• Tuesday, Oct 29, 8:30 a.m.: Hernandez and Lamb
• Thursday, Oct 31, 8:30 a.m.: Merrigan and Moran
• Friday, Nov. 1, 8:30 a.m.: Wilkinson

A set of candidate forums for councilors may also be in works at Northern Berkshire Community Television; a schedule will be posted as soon as that is confirmed.
 
Informal meet-and-greets with council candidates have also been held at Luma's Muffin and Mug and other venues around the city. 
 
A final "meet the candidates breakfast" is being sponsored by the North Adams Elks at the hall at 100 Eagle St., on Sunday, Nov. 3, from 8 to 11 a.m. 
 
We have linked to the Facebook fan pages we found and profile pages being used for the campaign; candidates who have FB pages or websites we missed should send us the links at info@iberkshires.com.
     

Pittsfield Ward 3 Seekers Debate For Egremont Pupils

By Andy McKeever
iBerkshires Staff
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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The Ward 3 candidates fielded hardball questions from the group of 23 students who volunteered to help organize and put on the debate.

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — A candidate for public office faces tough questions during the election season.

On Tuesday, Ward 3 candidates were peppered with tough questions from those who could end up being the most affected by their election — the fifth grade students at Egremont Elementary.

A group of 23 pupils went beyond studying civics in the classroom and volunteered to put on a debate between Nicholas Caccamo and Richard Latura. The two are seeking a seat on the City Council representing the ward.
 
"It is firsthand study of government. Most of them didn't know what a councilman did [prior to the debate]," said teacher Judy Callahan."Hopefully it is a memorable experience for them."
 
The idea originated about a month ago from the School Council, which was discussing the fifth grade civics lessons. The students started the lesson when Mayor Daniel Bianchi visited the class to explain how government works. From there, the School Council and the school worked together on the debate idea and Pittsfield Community Television agreed to film and televise it.
 
"We're always discussing what academic programs are happening in the school," said Dennis Guyer, a former state representative and member of the council. "It sort of organically came, 'why not have a debate?'"
 
He added, "there are 500 kids here, that's 500 families. This [election] is important for the whole school community."
 
The debate supplemented the lessons created by teacher Karen McHugh and Callahan, Christopher Blau and Christine Barry worked together to take the lessons into each of the fifth grade classrooms.
 
A core group of 23 students led the efforts to organize the debate and did everything from asking questions to running the PCTV cameras. Each of the fifth grade classes developed questions and the top 12 were chosen for the debate.
 
"The questions were all developed by the students," Guyer said.
 
The students had three rehearsals (one being a dress rehearsal in from of the entire fifth grade class) and on Tuesday, the live debate hit the airwaves. 
 
Caccamo led off with an opening statements saying he is the best choice to get the voices of Ward 3 heard.
 
"We make decisions that affect the whole city. But the mark of a good Ward 3 councilor is one who responds to constituents' concerns," Caccamo said. 
 
Meanwhile, Latura said he wants to lead a change in City Hall with a focus on public safety.
 
"We get the same cookie-cutter politicians years after year," he said. "You can't have change when you get the same thing."
 
The students' questions included ways to reduce class sizes and traffic dangers on street they live on, parking at Deming Park, healthy school lunches, streetlights and cleanliness of the waterways and of the city.
 
Latura said the traffic questions are a main focus of his campaign. He said he wants to make sure the side streets are safe and the way to do that is to reduce traffic on residential areas and get them onto the main roads.
 
"The biggest problem in our ward, that I see, is traffic on the side streets. We need to get the cars off of the side roads and onto the main roads," he said, adding that he would push to hire more police officers to patrol. "We need a high police presence."
The debate took short breaks for students to present facts about Berkshire County they discovered during their civics research.

Caccamo said he would be an advocate for additional speed bumps and signage that will slow traffic in troubled areas.

Meanwhile, Caccamo said the biggest issue facing the ward is vacant buildings and properties — particularly the former Hibbard School and the former Grossman's lot. He said he would push for reuse for those sites.

Also regarding roads the children live on, Caccamo said he supports retrofitting the street lights with modern technology that allows the city to control them remotely, thus reducing energy costs. Latura said he would like to see all of the streetlights switched to LED to both increase brightness and reduce energy usage.
 
In a question about the plowing of the roads, Latura said the city contracts that out and it hasn't worked. He advocates for having the city's Department of Public Works take over the plowing because it would make it a priority and would not have private contracts to attend to first.
 
Meanwhile, Caccamo says he "isn't opposed" to contracting for the service because the city would have to add staff in order to make sure the job is complete. He believes he can work with the city and the contractors to set priorities of roads that need to be plowed. And the same goes for repairs to road surfaces, he said.
 
"The key is how loud your voice can be promoting Ward 3," Caccamo said. 
 
The pupils were also concerned with contamination of the waterways; both candidates agreed that the cleanup progress is being made — slowly. Latura said all of the waterways are contaminated in some way but the city is on the right track with it. Caccamo said the city is working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to rebuild the ecosystems and that in 20 to 30 years, there will be a very much improved system.
 
However, Caccamo also said the Housatonic River needs to be dredged.
 
"We need to work on a long-term solution that will get the contaminated sediment away from city," he said.
 
In response to a question about graffiti and litter, Latura said there are programs that are not being utilized to help clean up. He advocated for working with the Berkshire County House of Correction to have inmates clean neighborhoods and advocated for organizing community cleanups. 
 
Caccamo said with proper oversight and times, he would also support using inmates for cleanups. He also said he would push for additional police patrols to go to schools at night as a deterrent to graffiti and vandalism.
 
For education, Latura said he would try to seek out additional funds from the state. He said the gaming legislation "promised" additional money for schools but that has yet to be seen. He says he will work on finding out how to get more funds from the state.
 
"Public education, we really have to stand behind it," Latura said. "We need to get as much money into it as we can."
 
Caccamo works for the school system so he won't be able to vote on the budget itself. He says he will push for additional funds for the school — particularly by adding math and literacy coaches. As for lunches, Caccamo says he believes the school should look into programs such as a "farm-to-school" program to bring in healthy options. He also said he would support building in additional professional development days for the cafeteria workers to learn about healthy alternatives. 
 
Latura also said he would like to hire additional teachers as needed to keep class sizes small. Caccamo said he would work with the teachers' union to negotiate maximum class sizes.
 
Dennis Guyer served as moderator. 
When the student questions ran out, Guyer, who was serving as moderator, asked some of his own. In response to the proposed retail construction at the William Stanley Business Park, both candidates strongly opposed the retail option.
 
"These are minimum-wage jobs. They will only shift jobs in the long run and other retail businesses will close," Caccamo said. "Retail is probably the worst thing the city could put there."
 
Latura called for "real jobs" with benefits and good pay — particularly companies organically grown from within the city rather than from out of town developers. 
 
As for crime, Latura reiterated his push for additional police officers while Caccamo said the budget doesn't allow for that much of an increase in the force. Caccamo said he would look for "more progressive" methods such as the city's recent hiring of a crime analyst to fight crime more efficiently.
 
Latura and Caccamo both called for the Elm Street merchants to band together in efforts to promote business outside of the downtown areas. 
 
"I want the businesses to get the attention they deserve," Latura said.
 
But, neither would answer the toughest question of them all — Teo's or Hot Dog Ranch?
 
While the students aren't quite old enough to vote yet, Principal Judy Rush told them that "the people who are in office now are making decisions that affect your life now and in the future."
     

Ward 3 Hopefuls Outline Platforms in Pittsfield Debate

By Joe Durwin
Pittsfield Correspondent
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Nicholas Caccamo, left, Thomas Wells, Richard Latura and Jeffrey Germann express their ideas for Ward 3 at Berkshire Community College.

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Four contenders for an open seat in Pittsfield's Ward 3 laid out their priorities and concerns in a debate held Monday, in advance of a preliminary election that will narrow the race next Tuesday.

Nicholas Caccamo, Jeffrey Germann, Richard Latura and Thomas Wells expressed their diverse opinions on issues ranging from traffic and commerce to more neighborhood concerns about the disposition of the Hibbard school and the conversion of a former church into a day care.

The debate sponsored by the Pittsfield Gazette and Pittsfield Community Television at Berkshire Community College was broadcast live. Moderator was Dan Dillon.

The four are vying for an open ward seat. Two will be chosen in the preliminary to proceed to the November election; the only other preliminary race is in Ward 1.

Perspectives among the candidates varied somewhat on the Pittsfield Economic Development Authority and an emerging proposal for a big-box store at the William Stanley Business Park, which straddles the border of Wards 2 and 3. 

Wells voiced the most enthusiasm for the proposal, expressing disappointment with the rate of progress of PEDA in attracting industrial or technology business to the former GE property. "I think we should explore other uses, whether it's retail or something to that effect," he said.

"I think PEDA is doing a good job," Germann espoused, suggesting Pittsfield "wait it out" for a better possibility. "I don't agree with another box store."

"I don't agree with putting retail into it," said Latura, "I do agree that [the process] has dragged, and dragged, and dragged."

Caccamo expressed some skepticism about the viability of developing the site for retail, but also emphasized that challenges to attracting major manufacturing operations may be even more daunting. "It may mean 50 or 60 jobs here and there," he said, "but I don't think it's going to be the manufacturing hub it once was."

The Ward 4 hopefuls also offered their ideas on the future possibilities for the former Hibbard Alternative High School building on Newell Street, which was closed in 2009 because of facility inadequacies and worsening building conditions.

Latura suggested that if financially feasible, the building could perhaps become a secondary fire station or house additional city offices, but voiced staunch opposition to it being sold for commercial purposes.

Caccamo questioned the educational impact of re-absorbing the program and students at Hibbard into its other high schools: "Maybe it should return to that use."  

Germann agreed that this was a strong option that should be examined. Wells also believed the building still had potential for educational uses, potentially as a site for the Adult Learning Center, whose relocation to a rented North Street retail site last year proved controversial.

The candidates were evenly divided on a plan by the Building Blocks day-care center to reuse the former All Souls Mission on Pembroke Avenue.

Wells and Caccamo both thought the day-care operation (currently located on Dalton Avenue) would make an ideal use of the vacant property if concerns of abutting neighbors can be addressed; Latura and Germann staunchly opposed a change in use that they believe will create major traffic and parking issues at that location.

The four contenders outlined differing priorities and perspectives in what they hope to bring to the role of councilor for Ward 3, for which two candidates will emerge next Tuesday to run in the general election in November.

"I think we need to better monitor taking care of our properties," indicated Wells, calling for an improved building maintenance plan. Wells said he believed he could bring business experience and "new ideas" to representing Ward 3.

"Residents want to see projects that enhance the city, past Ward 3," said Caccamo, who pointed to his experience attending council meetings following unsuccessful runs for mayor and at-large councilor. "I think most importantly being accessible to constituents, returning phone calls and emails and getting the information back to them, that requires a good deal of organization and that's all going to be part of making sound votes and improving the infrastructure and well being citywide."

"We need to start making our neighborhoods safe," said Latura, who repeatedly emphasized public safety issues such as crime and traffic. "Then we can concentrate on the arts and entertainment, and we can get back to everything else.  First we need to make our neighborhoods safe, and the rest of the city will follow."

Germann cited road repairs as one of his highest priority issues, and also urged for refurbishing of Goodrich Pond.
"We've got to fix the roads and sidewalks first. when I'm elected, I will work hard to make sure your issues are addressed in a timely manner," he said.

     

Crime, Politics at Issue in Pittsfield's Ward One Race

By Joe Durwin
Pittsfield Correspondent
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Ward 1 candidates Lisa Tully, left, Tammy Ives and incumbent Christine Yon debated ward issues at Berkshire Community College on Monday night. Next week's preliminary election will determine which two will face off in November.

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — With eight days until a municipal preliminary election, three candidates made their cases on Monday for serving Ward 1 on the City Council next term.

The preliminary on Tuesday, Sept. 24, will narrow the field down to two; the only other preliminary that day will be in Ward 3.

Incumbent two-term Councilor Christine Yon, who ran unopposed in 2011, faced off with challengers Tammy Ives and Lisa Tully on issues such as crime, the city's high school building needs and recent methadone clinic controversy at Berkshire Community College in a live broadcast debate sponsored by the Pittsfield Gazette and Pittsfield Community Television. Moderator was PCTV's David Cachet.

Yon stressed recent actions and appropriations by the City Council as having accomplished much but having further to go, while Tully cited perceived frustrations in the ward with current city politics.  

Ives, who said her desire to run emerged out of dissatisfaction with the incumbent councilor's handling of a parking issue on her street, frequently repeated a focus on improving communication with ward residents.

All three candidates agreed in opposition to a failed plan by Spectrum Health Systems to locate a methadone treatment clinic in a largely residential area of Ward 1, though Tully differed with Yon's handling of the issue.

"I did what I could do to represent my neighbors ... I took it on the chin, but I would do it again," said Yon, who publicly protested the site and later challenged the handling of the negotiations with Spectrum by Mayor Daniel Bianchi and City Solicitor Kathleen Degnan. "I was able to prevent that methadone clinic from going on that residential neighborhood on Stoddard Ave."

"I would have talked to the mayor to see what we could have done," said Tully. "My first response would have been to talk to Dr. Adamo who owned the house, to see if he could get the methadone clinic where it was originally supposed to be put, off North Street."

Tully called crime in their ward "a major issue," and called for increased city support of neighborhood watch programs.

Ives said many residents she's spoken to in the campaign were felt they were not receiving enough information from police, city councilors and the mayor's office.

"They have a lot of concerns about the break-ins and the lack of communication from the city," said Ives. "They just feel like they're not being heard."

Yon said crime is a citywide problem, but cited as recent progress the City Council's recent approval of a new crime analyst position in the Police Department, a concept first vetted in the Police Advisory Committee recently reactivated Bianchi last fall.

Yon said that through this analyst processing crime reports, the city "will be better able to utilize our resources exactly where they need to be."

With the city to decide whether to renovate or replace the existing Taconic High School while maintaining Pittsfield High School, Ives was firm that this decision should be solely up to the voters, while Yon and Tully agreed that this should be a cooperative effort between all parts of city government and the voters.

In regard to what city government could be doing better, Yon said the biggest improvement she'd like to see is more funding for maintenance of city buildings, such as the former fire station on Tyler Street and the McKay Street parking garage, which incurred large expenses last year because of years of deferred maintenance.

"You can be pennywise and pound foolish," said Yon. "We need to take better care of our buildings, they're our assets."

Ives suggested that police patrols of downtown currently done in the morning should be done toward evening, and also argued for increased police presence in city parks.

"The parks in Pittsfield definitely need some sort of patrolling," Ives stressed. "There's just not enough patrols at the parks."

Tully agreed that police increases were a priority, emphasizing traffic enforcement.

"If the police could be funded a little bit more, then maybe we could have more people out patrolling, and then all the problems with the speeders, the congestion, and the accidents on the road could stop before they happen."

"We might not always agree, but I think we need to work together to get things done," Tully added, in closing remarks that emphasized the polarization in city politics. "I know that I would work well with the current City Council and administration."

"I may not have all the answers right now, as far as exactly what's going on specifically," concluded Ives, who passed on several debate questions. "But I'm nore than willing to learn, and will do my best in order to serve everybody."

"My motto is 'How Can We?' " said Yon in summation of her service on the council. "I believe through teamwork with department heads, we can find solutions."

     

North Adams Sees Races for Mayor, Council

By Tammy Daniels
iBerkshires Staff
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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Coakley is greeted by supporters at Freight Yard Pub.
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State Rep. Gailanne Cariddi, right, and state Sen. Benjamin Downing, coordinator of the Democratic state campaign, accompanied the candidate.
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City Clerk Marilyn Gomeau waits for any final candidates to return nomination papers on Tuesday.

NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — Nearly more than half the City Council will turn over in this year's municipal elections.

Among the names missing from the ballot will be Council President Michael Bloom, Alan Marden and Marie Harpin — all of whom have served for at least two decades. Also missing is another veteran of city politics, John Barrett III, who served only two years on the council but 26 as mayor.

Three potential candidates had taken out papers to challenge Mayor Richard Alcombright but only one had returned them by Tuesday: Robert R. Moulton Jr.

Not returning papers are Richard David Greene, who had been handing out his campaign stance while collecting signatures, and former mayoral candidate Ronald A. Boucher. Greene is reportedly running a write-in campaign.

"We've been friends for 50 years, I still consider him a friend and he comes from a great family," said Alcombright of his opponent. "Rob was right with me at my announcement four years ago but we've had our differences."

Alcombright said Moulton had described their positions as "far apart," how far apart to be debated this campaign season. "I'm looking forward to raising these issues with him," he said. "It should be a good and friendly campaign."

Moulton agreed, saying "we're friends with different points of view ... We'll let the people decide."

"I'm looking forward to the campaign, I'm sure there are a lot of good issues we'll be debating, some different views on the way the city should be run," he said. "It should be very entertaining and I think it will be good for the city."

There are 15 14 13 12 candidates for the nine at-large City Council seats, although three still need signatures to be certified: incumbents Lisa Blackmer and David A. Bond, and newcomer Kate Hanley Merrigan. (David Bond did not have enough certified signatures.)

"There are a lot of new people," said City Clerk Marilyn Gomeau, as the seconds counted down to the 5 p.m. deadline. "But we always have a big amount of people [for council]."

Newcomers on the ballot this year are Merrigan, David R. Robbins, Benjamin J. Lamb, Joshua J. Moran, *Anthony M. Sarkis Jr. and Michael Denault, as well as Planning Board member Wayne J. Wilkinson and previous council candidates Eric Buddington, Robert F. Cardimino and Michael J. Hernandez. (Michael Denault withdrew his candidacy on Aug. 19 because he is moving to Vermont.)

Incumbents returning papers were Blackmer, Bond, Keith Bona, Jennifer M. Breen and Nancy P. Bullett.

Edward Lacosse, Richard Lacosse Jr. and MaryAnn Benoit-Albee had informed Gomeau they would not be returning papers for council.

"I'm just really pleased to so many candidates, and a new younger field taking an interest in the city, and to see so many incumbents staying in," said the mayor. "It's sad to see Mike Bloom and Al Marden off the council because of the historical reference that they bring and their service to the city. They should be commended.

"Marie, her years of service not only on the council but through the BCAC and beyond, that just speaks volumes of her as a community leader. I wish them all well."

Alcombright said he commended "anybody for coming out now and being in public service ... it's not an easy thing to do."

Running for three seats on the School Committee are incumbents John Hockridge, Heather Putnam Boulger and Mark P. Moulton and newcomer Michele L. Vareschi. Stewart Burns did not return papers.

There is no race for McCann School Committee, with incumbents Paul A. Gigliotti and Gary F. Rivers running unopposed.

*Sarkis submitted a letter to the city clerk on Aug. 8 stating he was withdrawing because his professional business had to be a priority.

     
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Where to vote in Berkshire County

State Election
Tuesday, Nov. 4

Voting is from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Deadline to register or change party affiliation was Oct.15.


Candidates on the ballot in races for state office; all others on the ballot are unopposed. Links will take you to their campaign websites.

U.S. Senator
Edward J. Markey, Democrat
Brian J. Herr, Republican

Governor/Lieutenant Governor
Charlie Baker & Karyn Polito, Republican
Martha Coakley & Stephen Kerrigan, Democrat
Evan Falchuk & Angus Jennings, United Independent Party
Scott Lively & Shelly Saunders, Independent
Jeff McCormick & Tracy Post, Independent 

Attorney General
Maura Healey, Democratic
John B. Miller, Republican

Secretary of State
William Francis Galvin, Democratic
David D'Arcangelo, Republican
Daniel L. Factor, Green-Rainbow

Treasurer
Deborah B. Goldberg, Democratic
Michael James Heffernan, Republican
Ian T. Jackson, Green-Rainbow

Auditor
Suzanne M. Bump, Democratic
Patricia S. Saint Aubin, Republican
MK Merelice, Green-Rainbow

Municipal Elections

The cities of Pittsfield and North Adams will hold municipal elections for mayor, city council and school committee in 2015

You may vote absentee: if you will be absent from your town or city on election day, have a physical disability that prevents you from voting at the polls or cannot vote at the polls because to religious beliefs.

2010 Special Senate Election Results

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Bosley Looks to Wind Up Legislative Career
There's a New Sheriff in Town
Three Make Case for 2nd District Seat
Cariddi Clear Winner in 1st District
Longtime City Councilor Cariddi Kicks Off State Rep Campaign
Candidates Forum Scheduled for Aug 17
Bissaillon Campaign Hosts Pancake Breakfast
Baker Wins Governor's Race
Suzanne Bump Seeking Re-election as Auditor
Election Day 2010
Recent Entries:
Independent Falchuk Hits Threshold To Start New Party
Baker Wins Governor's Race
AG Candidate Healey Hears Concerns on Hospital
Candidate Kerrigan Stops in Pittsfield For Get Out The Vote Push
Suzanne Bump Seeking Re-election as Auditor
U.S. Senate Candidate Brian Herr Fighting for Name Recognition
Area Democrats Making Final Push For November Election
Coakley Stresses Commitment to Berkshires
Candidates Showing Differences As Governor's Race Heats Up
Gubernatorial Candidates Spar In Springfield Debate