Rockwell Museum Hosts Annual High School Art Show

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STOCKBRIDGE, Mass. — The annual Berkshire County High School Art Show returns for its 26th year at Norman Rockwell Museum with an exhibition opening on Saturday, Feb. 4, from 1 to 4 p.m.

The opening event will include refreshments, the chance to meet the artists behind the works on view, as well as a lecture at 2 for budding artists and their families provided by multimedia artist Ricky Bernstein.

This year's exhibit showcases 131 works of art in a variety of media from 16 different schools and organizations in Berkshire County. The show allows young artists ro learn how to prepare their work for a gallery show, acquire a personal understanding of the exhibition process, and have the opportunity to exhibit their work in a professional museum setting. Admission is free for the high school show, but it does not include regular museum admission. The exhibition is sponsored by Berkshire Bank Foundation/Legacy Region.

Participating schools include Berkshire Arts & Technology Public Charter School, Berkshire School, Drury High School, John Dewey Academy, Lenox Memorial High School, Miss Hall's School, Monument Mountain Regional High School, Mount Everett High School, Mount Greylock Regional High School, Pittsfield High School, St. Joseph Central High School, Taconic High School and Wahconah Regional High School. Student work from the Renaissance Art School and the 21st Century Spartan Launch Program will also be on view.

Bernstein is a sculptor who uses large glass and aluminum wall reliefs to tell a visual story. His oversized cartoon graphics recall a bygone era of coffee klatches and domestic dramas. His multimedia art presents a narrative of collage-style glass wall hangings with a distinct pop-art flavor.

The following Mount Greylock High students are participating:

Students of Jane-Ellen DeSomma are 10th-graders Alex Delano, Hannah Dubreuil, Kelsey Hadley and RoseMarie Mele; 11th-grader Heidi Lescarbeau; and 12th-graders Wesley Davis, Mary Laidlaw and Hallie Walker. Students of Michael Powers are Chelsea Dean and Nick Zimmerman, both in Grade 12.
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Neal Announces CARES Act Grants for Cultural Organizations

By Stephen DravisiBerkshires Staff

Norman Rockwell Museum CEO Laurie Norton Moffat, Rep. Richard Neal and Mass Humanities Executive Director Brian Boyles pose beneath a banner with Rockwell's depiction of Rosie the Riveter.

STOCKBRIDGE, Mass. — Rep. Richard Neal, D-Springfield, visited the Norman Rockwell Museum on Friday to announce $72,500 in grants to benefit cultural institutions throughout Berkshire County.

The funds are part of $75 million in grants distributed by the National Endowment for the Humanities from the $2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act.

Neal told his audience about the expedited process that got the CARES Act enacted and predicted success for the next round of federal stimulus, the Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions, or HEROES, Act.
 
Neal, who is facing his own primary battle on Sept. 1, dismissed the idea that time was running out to reach a compromise on a new stimulus in an election year.
 
“[The Republicans] were all in on the CARES Act; they were not all in on the HEROES Act,” said Neal, who is the chairman of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee, which drafted both CARES and HEROES. “[Senate Majority Leader Mitch] McConnell, as you know, described it as a 'wish list.' Well, that's what legislation is. It’s architecture.
 
“I think that … he has said 'No' every time, only to have the Senate pass these issues unanimously. So when reporters would say to me, 'How are you going to get past [McConnell],' I'd say, 'He always says no to start. Then he says yes to the legislation.' "
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