Twenty Williams Students, Alumni Awarded Fulbright Grants

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WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — Eighteen Williams College students and two graduates have been offered Fulbright grants for 2018-19, matching the college's record set last year for the number of Fulbright recipients in one year.

Six of the honorees will receive one-year grants to study or conduct research in their academic fields, and 14 will receive English Teaching Assistantships for teaching abroad. English Teaching Assistants help local students increase their English language skills and their knowledge of the United States. 

All Fulbrighters work, live with and learn from the people of their host country, sharing daily experiences and working to develop academic and professional expertise.

Several Williams applicants have been designated as alternates. Decisions for those candidates will be made later in the spring. The Fulbright winners from Williams are:

* Tamar Aizenberg '18, a history major from Highland Park, Ill., a research grant in history to Austria;

* Daisy Banta '18, a biology major from Richmond, Va., an English teaching assistantship to Brazil;

* Josselyn Barahona '18, a biology major from Sun Valley, Calif., a research grant in biology to Chile;

* Jackson Barber '18, a mathematics major from Idaho Falls, Idaho, an English teaching assistantship to Thailand;

* Stephanie Caridad '18, an English and Spanish major from Manhattan Beach, Calif., an English teaching assistantship to Poland;

* Benjamin Decker '18, a computer science and economics major from Yarmouth, Maine, an English teaching assistantship to Mexico;

* Elyza Dottin '18, a history major from Littleton, Mass., an English teaching assistantship to Colombia;

* Matthew Goss '17, a chemistry major from Seattle, Wash., a research grant in chemistry to Sweden;

* Charles Jersey '18, a chemistry and German major from Westport, Conn., an English teaching assistantship to Germany;

* Juliet Kelso '18, an anthropology and German major from New York, N.Y., an English teaching assistantship to Germany;

* Molly Knoedler '18, a mathematics major from Sheboygan, Wisc., a research grant in mathematics to New Zealand;

* Arielle Rawlings '18, a political economy and psychology major from Ketchum, Idaho, an English teaching assistantship to India;

* Caroline Ryan '18, a chemistry and English major from Stamford, Conn., an English teaching assistantship to Poland;

* Nohemi Sepulveda '18, a mathematics and Spanish major from Van Nuys, Calif., an English teaching assistantship to Spain;

* Marissa Shapiro '18, a history major from New York, N.Y., an English teaching assistantship to Czech Republic;

* Jacob Sperber '18, a psychology major from Woodcliff Lake, N.J., a research grant in biology to Spain;

* Darla Torres '18, a mathematics major from Miami, Fla., an English teaching assistantship to South Korea;

* Phuong Vo '18, an economics major from Anaheim, Calif., an English teaching assistantship to Germany;

* Sarah Weiser '17, a history and Russian major from Merrion Station, Pa., a research grant in history to Russia; and

* Jamie Wu '18, a comparative literature and history major from Brooklyn, N.Y., an English teaching assistantship to Taiwan.

The Fulbright Program is funded by the Department of State and is the largest international exchange program in the United States. It was established by the U.S. Congress in 1946 and offers various grants in research and teaching for students, scholars, and professionals.


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Williamstown Panel Looks at Context of Historic Monuments

By Stephen DravisiBerkshires Staff

A sign erected by the Williamstown Historical Commission to recognize the site of the 18th Century West Hoosac Fort.
WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — The town's newest committee Monday got down to the business of finding ways to talk about the truth of the Village Beautiful's founding.
 
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