Letter: Honor All Our Children and Community

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To the Editor:

It was interesting an appreciated that Mass MoCA recently honored the artworks of area students. But, at the same time, the museum continues to dishonor the work of the North Adams schoolchildren, teachers, artist and parents who created the historic depiction of mill workers and their products that adorned the pillars on Marshall Street in North Adams.

To refresh the memory of the reader of this letter, you may recall that last year [ed. two years ago] the art museum illegally painted over the artwork with a coat of gray paint. Despite strong support of area residents who signed petitions calling for testing of the site with a possibility of restoration as the art was covered over with an anti-graffiti paint, the mayor and Joseph Thompson, director of Mass MoCA, continue to turn their backs on our community. As a result of this action, it appears that the public commission on art has been adversely challenged and seems reluctant to act in response to the negative position of the "power influences" in North Adams.


We understand that some of the public may be tiring of this issue, but for folks like us, we continue to be willing to speak out on behalf of the children, and all others who contributed to the creation of the historic works reflecting the past economic life of the community and its ancestors. We will continue to press forward in accomplishing the goal of testing and hopefully, restoring a part of our past for all present and future citizens of our city. With that said, "Out of sight is not out of mind!"

It is time to honor all our children and citizens, and Mr. Thompson along with the mayor have a role to play in bringing the artist and other interested parties together in resolving this lingering problem.

Vincent Melito
North Adams, Mass.

 

 


Tags: public art,   

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Estate Plans Can Help You Answer Questions About the Future

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