BMC Achieves Awards for Stroke Care

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PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Berkshire Medical Center has received the Defect-free Care Award and three additional Stroke Care honors from the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Program at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Defect-free care is achieved when a patient receives the appropriate care based on clinical guidelines.

The Coverdell Defect-free Care Award recognizes hospitals that, from the period of January 2018 to December 2018, provided defect-free care to 90 percent or more of their stroke patients by utilizing all of the interventions for which each patient was eligible. The number of Coverdell hospitals providing defect-free care to the majority of their patients has increased significantly over the last six years, resulting in many more patients receiving high-quality care.

In addition, BMC was recognized by the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Program for Dysphagia Screening greater than or equal to 95 percent, the Modified Rankin Scale greater than or equal to 85 percent and the NIH Stroke Scale Rate of at least 95 percent. BMC was recognized for dysphagia screening on at least 95 percent of stroke patients; Modified Rankin Scale on at least 85 percent of stroke patients; and having performed NIH Stroke Scale assessments on at least 95 percent of stroke patients. All were based on data from 2018.

"Our Stroke Care Team at Berkshire Medical Center is proud that our hard work and passion for providing great care was recognized by these prestigious awards from the DPH's Paul Coverdell Acute Stroke Program," said Dr. Gray Ellrodt, chair of Medicine and chief quality officer. "We strive to provide exceptional care to all of our patients."

Stroke is the fifth-leading cause of death in Massachusetts and a leading cause of adult disability. Immediate assessment and treatment is critical to help improve outcomes. Knowing the key signs and symptoms of stroke and calling 9-1-1 immediately can save a life. The F.A.S.T. acronym is an easy way to remember:

* Face: Does the face look uneven? Ask the person to smile

* Arm: Does one arm drift down? Ask the person to raise both arms

* Speech: Does the speech sound strange? Ask the person to repeat a phrase

* Time: If you observe these symptoms, call 9-1-1

For more information the Massachusetts Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Program, or about FAST and the DPH stroke awareness campaign, visit the website.


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By Jack GuerinoiBerkshires Staff
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