Gittens Scores 10 in Collegiate Debut for MCLA

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JOHNSON, Vt. -- Noah Yearsley scored a game-high 21, and Taconic graduate Quentin Gittens scored 10 in his collegiate debut as the MCLA men's basketball team opened with a 77-63 win over Johnson State on Friday night.
 
Gittens tied with Mike Demartinis for the team-high with nine rebounds, and the Taconic grad had a couple of steals in the win.
 
Demartinis also scored 17, and Nick Escabi added eight for the Trailblazers.
 
MCLA (1-0) plays Lyndon State on Saturday afternoon.
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'Dark Waters': 'They Were All My Sons'

By Michael S. GoldbergeriBerkshires Film Critic
"They were all my sons." — Joe, in Arthur Miller's "All My Sons"
 
Pogo's Walt Kelly capsulized man's inhumanity to man when he coined a cynical variation on U.S. Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry's 1813 missive to Army General William Henry Harrison, informing, after the victory at Lake Erie, "We have met the enemy and they are ours." Kelly's version, written on the occasion of the infamous McCarthy hearings, and since employed in anti-pollution demonstrations, reads, "We have met the enemy and he is us."
 
So, what do we do? A closing statement in Todd Haynes' beyond disturbing "Dark Waters," about one lawyer's crusade against the DuPont Co. for its long history of polluting the environment, apprises that 99 percent of all human beings on this Earth have traces of toxic PFOA, a "forever chemical" used to make Teflon, among other things, in their bloodstreams. But only the most naïve of us is truly startled by either this information or the studious, documentary-like divulgences that build up to it in Haynes' important muckrake.
 
Fact is, we've been poisoning humankind's well since first we learned how to make a profit out of it while concomitantly rationalizing, if bothering at all, that we'll worry about it later. Well, it's later.
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