Clark Art Virtual Writing Programs

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WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — The Clark Art Institute will offer two free virtual writing sessions in celebration of spring at noon on Tuesday, March 9, and Tuesday, March 16. 
 
Each session features different works from the Clark's collection as inspiration for workshops led by members of the Clark's Education Department.
 
The interactive virtual program is open to all regardless of experience and offers participants a focused writing session to encourage their creativity as they write their way through a series of open-ended prompts inspired by selected paintings and works-on-paper that feature spring themes. Participants may share their writing with the group at the conclusion of the program or they can opt to remain anonymous. In addition, all participants will be provided with additional nature writing prompts to use on their next springtime visit to the Clark's Ground/work exhibition.
 
Online registration is required; space is limited to 15 participants per session. Registration for the March 9 session closes at noon on Friday, March 5, and registration for the March 16 session closes on March 12, or when capacity is reached. Registrants will receive an email with a private link to this live virtual program before the event. Visit clarkart.edu/events to register. 

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Hasty Wants Williamstown to Do the 'Hard Right'

By Stephen DravisiBerkshires Staff
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