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Tyler Street Business Group President Diane Marcella, her husband, Ron, Mayor Linda Tyer, and Commissioner of Public Services and Utilities David Turocy cut the ribbons on the new trash cans.

Pittsfield Cuts Ribbon On Trash Cans For Tyler Street

By Andy McKeeveriBerkshires Staff
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PITTSFIELD, Mass. — The city cut a ribbon on four brand-new trash cans for Tyler Street on Thursday.
 
Yup, trash cans. 
 
"When you say we are going to be out here doing a ribbon cutting for trash cans, it is kind of comical in a sense. But when you really look at it, it took us two years to get them here," Tyler Street Business Group President Diane Marcella said. 
 
There were no places for pedestrians to dispose of rubbish. Through the city's budget, new trash cans featuring the city's logo will be placed along the street. City staff is responsible for emptying them.
 
"I love that they were designed, engineered, and built in Pittsfield for a Pittsfield neighborhood. It has the Pittsfield logo and the theme of environmental stewardship," Mayor Linda Tyer said.
 
A ribbon cutting for trash cans seems, well, a little ridiculous. But, the city, state, and private entities have been growing momentum behind a resurrection of the neighborhood. Recently, the Better Block program brought ideas of what the area could become to life and energized volunteers behind it. With that, every small step, even trash cans, continues that momentum.
 
"This is the first time ever that I've done a ribbon cutting for a garbage can," Tyer joked but emphasized the energy that has been growing behind a more focused approach at Tyler Street.
 
The cans were created by Tyler Street Welding in a way to make emptying them easier and without hinges which typically break or rust and decorated by Dr. Vinyl. The ribbon was cut by Marcella, her husband Ron, Mayor Linda Tyer, and Commissioner of Public Services and Utilities David Turocy.

Tags: ribbon cutting,   trash,   tyler street,   

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