Home About Archives RSS Feed

@theMarket: The Stock Market Is Not the Economy

By Bill Schmick
iBerkshires columnist
If ever one needed an example of the above saying, today's market would prove that point. Friday's unemployment figure for the month of April revealed that 20.3 million Americans are out of work, bringing the unemployment rate to 14.7 percent. The stock market gained more than one percent on the news.
 
While new cases of COVID-19 are reported and deaths multiply with no cure or vaccine in sight, the NASDAQ turned positive for the year. Corporate earnings have been abysmal and future guidance nonexistent for most companies, but their stocks went up anyway. How can this be, you might ask?
 
As I have said before, the stock market is a forward-looking mechanism. As such, investors are looking beyond this troubling period and anticipating that earnings, and ultimately the economy, will recover. At that point, we could see a typical "sell on the good news" event, but not now.
 
The economic data gave us some additional information on the victims of the pandemic. For one thing, the jobless rate would have been higher (by about another five percentage points), if workers had not classified themselves as "absent from work" instead of unemployed. Still, it was the largest, single monthly decline since record-keeping began back in 1948.
 
The leisure and hospitality industries led the declines, although every industry category experienced job losses. The majority of jobs lost were in low-paying areas indicating that wage earners at the bottom of the scale are taking the brunt of the virus fallout. It also explains why the average hourly wage gain suddenly increased by 4.7 percent, since, with so many low wage earners gone, those with higher wages predominate in the survey.
 
None of that mattered to the markets. From a financial point of view, the actions of the central bank in pouring trillions of new dollars into the financial system are why stocks continue to run. The Fed has all but nationalized the country's debt markets by buying or at least guaranteeing that they will be the buyer of last resort.
 
This week, I suspect that many investors, who tend to follow the headlines in making investment decisions (big mistake), and who sold during the recent downturn have been waiting for a chance to get back in on a re-test of those lows. threw in the towel. Those stock chasers are rushing back into the market now (and are probably late as usual).
 
One of the worries I have, however, is the overly large concentration of buying in a handful of mega stocks, especially the FANG names. The action is similar to the frenzied FOMO buying experienced at times when marijuana stocks or the meatless burger was "hot." I hope to see a broadening out of buying interest into more sectors and securities in order to feel more comfortable in the short-term.
 
Otherwise, like always, readers should soon expect to see some kind of corrective pattern descend upon the equity markets. We did have a 2-3 day sell off totaling about 4 percent from the highs a little over a week ago. The same thing could happen next week or the week after. That is the price of doing business in the stock market. The point is that until new data can show conclusively that the COVID-19 virus is on the waning, there will be that on-going risk of a 10 percent pullback. So, what?
 
Bill Schmick is registered as an investment adviser representative and portfolio manager with Berkshire Money Management (BMM), managing over $400 million for investors in the Berkshires.  Bill's forecasts and opinions are purely his own. None of the information presented here should be construed as an endorsement of BMM or a solicitation to become a client of BMM. Direct inquiries to Bill at 1-888-232-6072 (toll free) or email him at Bill@afewdollarsmore.com.
 

 

0 Comments
     

Support Local News

We show up at hurricanes, budget meetings, high school games, accidents, fires and community events. We show up at celebrations and tragedies and everything in between. We show up so our readers can learn about pivotal events that affect their communities and their lives.

How important is local news to you? You can support independent, unbiased journalism and help iBerkshires grow for as a little as the cost of a cup of coffee a week.

News Headlines
Mount Greylock Superintendent Grady Steps Down
Southwestern Vermont Health Care Launches Virtual Urgent Care
The Berkshire Museum Will Reopen Saturday, Aug. 1
Mount Greylock School Committee Appears Poised to Part Ways with Another Superintendent
Neal Announces CARES Act Grants for Cultural Organizations
Tropical Storm Bringing Heavy Rain to Berkshires
Drive Walk Bike by Art Show Friday In Pittsfield
Williamstown to Try Outdoor Dining on Spring Street Again Saturday
Clarksburg Sets Special Town Meeting for PILOT Authorization
Cultural Pittsfield This Week: July 10-16
 


Categories:
@theMarket (336)
Independent Investor (450)
Retired Investor (4)
Archives:
July 2020 (4)
July 2019 (3)
June 2020 (7)
May 2020 (9)
April 2020 (9)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (7)
January 2020 (10)
December 2019 (7)
November 2019 (8)
October 2019 (9)
September 2019 (7)
August 2019 (5)
Tags:
Commodities Interest Rates Markets Jobs Taxes Debt Ceiling Fiscal Cliff Stimulus Recession Wall Street Retirement Europe Congress Crisis Selloff Pullback Rally Stock Market Energy Debt Greece Japan Europe Economy Election Stocks Banks Oil Currency Euro Federal Reserve Deficit Bailout Housing Metals
Popular Entries:
The Independent Investor: Don't Fight the Fed
@theMarket: QE II Supports the Markets
The Independent Investor: Understanding the Foreclosure Scandal
@theMarket: Markets Are Going Higher
The Independent Investor: Does Cash Mean Currencies?
The Independent Investor: General Motors — Back to the Future
@theMarket: Economy Sputters, Stocks Stutter
The Independent Investor: How Will Wall Street II Play on Main Street?
The Independent Investor: Why Are Interest Rates Rising?
The Independent Investor: Will the Municipal Bond Massacre Continue?
Recent Entries:
@theMarket: COVID Case Concerns Cramp Market Gains
The Retired Investor: Next Bailout Should Address Job Creation
@theMarket: Markets Celebrate Fourth of July
The Retired Investor: Big Banks & Big Brother
@theMarket: The Virus Versus the Fed
The Retired Investor: Corporate Debt & the U.S. government
The Retired Investor: Inflation, a Factor to Forget?
@theMarket: Markets Fear New Virus Surge
The Retired Investor: The Virus & the Stock Market
@theMarket: Jobs Jubilee