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Contestants pose after 20 minutes of eating hot dogs to raise more than $1,000 toward the Eagle Street Initiative.
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City Council President Benjamin Lamb, in green, explains the rules.
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The benefit was a formal affair.
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Down the hatch.
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North Adams Dog-A-Thon Raises Over $1,000 for Eagle Street

By Jack GuerinoiBerkshires Staff
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NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — Over $1,000 was raised at the first NAMAzing Dog-A-Thon to benefit the Eagle Street Initiative.   
 
A small group formed at the pocket park on Eagle Street on Friday evening to watch six worthy competitors dressed in their Sunday best ingest as many Jack's Hot Dogs as they could in in very long 20 minutes.
 
After going over the universal signal for choking and strategically placing a barf bucket near the table, competitors Benjamin Lamb, Geeg Wiles, Mike Walker, Annie Rodgers, Nathan Rodgers and Piper Jacobs, 8, loaded their plates.
 
What started out as a sprint soon became an endurance contest as Nathan and Annie Rodgers tapped out early while Lamb, Wylde and Walker fought it out to the bitter end.
 
Although Jacobs was named the winner, earning a Jack's T-shirt and coupon, Lamb inhaled 10 dogs and was able to down half of a dog to cheers from the small crowd before time ran out, raising $330 on his own.
 
The Dog-A Thon is only part of fundraising efforts to raise $25,000 for a MassDevelopment matching grant to revitalize Eagle Street. Lamb, City Council president, has been spearheading the effort by the NAMAzing Initiative through the crowdfunding website Patronicity and with the nonprofit Partnership for North Adams as the financial agent.
 
The fundraising has reached more than $13,000 with another 21 days left. The funds could be used to create pop-up "parklets" for more social space, gateways to mark each entrance of the historic street, branded trash and recycling receptacles and highly visible signage for each business.
 
Lamb thanked Jack's Hot Dogs for its donation as well as all those who attended the event.
 
"Thank you all so much for coming out and thank you for your support both being here and cheering us on and watching us destroy ourselves and contributing to the Eagle Street Initiative," Lamb said after regaining his composure.
 
The entire 20 minute contest was streamed through Facebook Live here.

 

Tags: fundraiser,   good news,   hot dogs,   

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Estate Plans Can Help You Answer Questions About the Future

Submitted by Edward Jones

The word "estate" conjures images of great wealth, which may be one of the reasons so many people don't develop estate plans. After all, they're not rich, so why make the effort? In reality, though, if you have a family, you can probably benefit from estate planning, whatever your asset level. And you may well find that a comprehensive estate plan can help you answer some questions you may find unsettling – or even worrisome.

Here are a few of these questions:

* What will happen to my children?
With luck, you (and your co-parent, if you have one) will be alive and well at least until your children reach the age of majority (either 18 or 21, depending on where you live). Nonetheless, you don't want to take any chances, so, as part of your estate plans, you may want to name a guardian to take care of your children if you are not around. You also might want to name a conservator – sometimes called a "guardian of the estate" – to manage any assets your minor children might inherit.

* Will there be a fight over my assets? Without a solid estate plan in place, your assets could be subject to the time-consuming, expensive – and very public – probate process. During probate, your relatives and creditors can gain access to your records, and possibly even challenge your will. But with proper planning, you can maintain your privacy. As one possible element of an estate plan, a living trust allows your property to avoid probate and pass quickly to the beneficiaries you have named.

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