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The complex off East Street has three fields and a number of buildings in poor shape through lack of use.

Pittsfield Hoping To Bring Softball Back To The Complex This Summer

By Andy McKeeveriBerkshires Staff
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PITTSFIELD, Mass. — The city is currently looking for somebody to run a softball league at the 13-acre complex on East Street.
 
Last summer, with proper notice, the lessee of the city-owned park backed out of the lease in the final year. The building, which served as a concession stand, and the fields have fallen into poor condition. 
 
Purchasing Agent Colleen Hunter-Mullett offered the use of the fields during the day to an interested individual looking to continue a softball league there to finish out the summer, but that ultimately that did not come to fruition. The city was willing to allow that individual to finish the year for free.
 
"Because it is so late in the season, and the City really wants to provide a space for this type of activity for our residents, we are offering them the use of the fields at no cost as long as they are willing to maintain them for the duration of their league. We are looking at our options for future years," Hunter-Mullett wrote in an email last July.
 
This spring, the city issued a request for proposals for somebody else to take it over. But there were no bids. 
 
Now, Hunter-Mullett said she is again working with an individual to get softball leagues up and running again.
 
"Currently, I have a gentleman who is interested in running a softball league at the facility this summer. Once the snow melts we plan to meet with him on site to discuss the limitations of the facility, as well as the do's and don'ts," Hunter-Mullett wrote in an email this week.
 
"I have an e-mail into the Building Inspector's office to see if I can get something in writing as to the number of code violations the building has and what it will take to re-open the snack bar, or not, whichever the case may be."
 
Hunter-Mullett said the interested individual doesn't necessarily need a concession stand but he would like to know what it would take to get it back into compliance with city code.
 
"The gentleman interested in running the league agrees that he does not need to provide a concession stand in order to run a league because there is that great community interest in having the league itself.  But he would like to know what exactly the building needs in case he can come up with the money to fix the building. He plans to provide porta-johns at a minimum this summer," she wrote.
 
For years, Berkshire County Softball Complex Inc. and Jim Bridges ran league among the three fields on the parcel. Most recently, Mark Montemagni signed a lease in 2012 for five years and ran leagues. 
 
The city is now hoping to bring softball back to the complex this summer.

Tags: public parks,   softball,   sports facility,   sports fields,   

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Environment Secretary Visits Pittsfield


Kathleen Theoharides, secretary of energy and environmental affairs, visits the site of culvert project in Pittsfield being funded through the state's climate readiness program.
PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Kathleen Theoharides was in Pittsfield on Friday to review a state-funded culvert site and meet with local officials to discuss the state's climate readiness program. 
 
She joined Mayor Linda Tyer at the Churchill Street culvert, a site which recently received grant funding through the state's Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness (MVP) Program. The city was awarded an $814,524 state grant in June for the Churchill Brook and West Street Culvert Replacement Project.
 
Through the MVP program, which begun in 2017, municipalities identify key climate-related hazards, vulnerabilities and strengths, develop adaptation actions, and prioritize next steps. The initiative which initially started as a $500,000 capital grant program has now increased to $12 million. Pittsfield is among the 71 percent of communities across the commonwealth now enrolled in the MVP program.
 
"The governor and the lieutenant governor have made resilient infrastructure a priority all across the state and I think it's really important to know that we have a really vested interest in Western Massachusetts communities as well as all across the state, not forgetting the Berkshires or Pioneer Valley," said Theoharides in a statement. "Our MVP program is really focused on these types of partnership investments and looking to design infrastructure for the challenges we're seeing today and moving forward as climate change increases."
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