Pittsfield Woman Charged with Husband's Murder

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PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Charlene Grandson Martin, 45, entered a plea of not guilty on Monday to one charge of murder related to the stabbing death of her husband, Aurthur Martin.

Charlene Martin was arraigned in Central Berkshire District Court before Judge Frederic Rutberg. Her case was continued to March 9 for a pretrial conference.

According to police reports, Martin said she and her husband were watching television when he left the room and re-entered with a knife. She allegedly told police that they were joking around when she pushed his arm away and he was struck by the knife.

Her explanation was reportedly inconsistent with the findings of the medical examiner, according to The Berkshire Eagle. Police said the couple had a history of domestic incidents and that Martin has been the "agressor." The knife was found in a closet.

Martin is being held without bail in the Berkshire County House of Correction.

Posted Feb. 8, 2009

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — An autopsy by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner has determined that stabbing victim Arthur Martin bled to death.

Martin, 49, died early Saturday morning at Berkshire Medical Center. His wife, Charlene Grandson Martin, 45, is facing a murder charge in her husband's slaying.

Dr. Andrew Sexton, an associate medical examiner, conducted the autopsy on Arthur Martin on Sunday in Holyoke. The autopsy revealed that Martin bled to death as a result of a stab wound to his thigh, which cut the femoral artery. 


Posted Feb. 7, 2009

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — A Pittsfield woman has been charged with murder in connection with the apparent stabbing death of her husband last night.
 
Charlene Grandson Martin, 45, is being held in the Pittsfield Police lockup on $1 million bail pending arraignment Monday morning in Central Berkshire District Court in Pittsfield. She is facing one count of murder in the apparent stabbing death of her 49-year-old husband, Arthur Martin.

Berkshire District Attorney David F. Capeless, in a statement released this morning, said the Pittsfield Police Department received a 911 call about 11:20 Friday evening reporting a stabbing at 341 West St., Building 40. 

Police, fire and emergency medical technicians responded to the call.
 
Arthur Martin, a resident of that address, was transported to Berkshire Medical Center, suffering from an apparent stab wound. He was pronounced dead early Saturday morning. An autopsy will be conducted at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Holyoke within the next several days.
 
The investigation is being conducted by members of the Pittsfield Police Department with assistance from the state police Crime Scene Services Section. Detectives Thomas Bowler and John Gray are the lead investigators on the case. 

Anyone who has any information pertaining to this incident is asked to call the Pittsfield Police Department at 413-448-9700.
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PCTV Documentary Finds Pittsfield Parade Dates Back to 1801

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Pittsfield Community Television's recently released documentary "Fighting For Independence:  The History of the Pittsfield Fourth of July Parade" has traced the first Pittsfield Fourth of July Parade back to at least 1801.  

An article in the Pittsfield Sun from July 7, 1801, says that "at 12:00 o’ clock at noon a Procession was formed consisting of the Militia of the town."

Previously the Pittsfield Parade Committee acknowledged that the parade dated back to 1824.

"This was a fascinating discovery, as we researched to put this documentary together," said Bob Heck, PCTV’s coordinator of advancement and community production and executive producer of the program.  "Not only were we able to trace the parade back further than ever before, but to see how the parade has impacted Pittsfield, and how the community always seems to come together to make sure the parade happens is remarkable."

The Pittsfield Fourth of July parade experienced bumps in the road even back in the early 1800s - most notably, when Captain Joseph Merrick, a Federalist, excluded Democrats from the yearly post-parade gathering at his tavern in 1808.

The parade ran concurrently from at least 1801 until 1820. In 1821, Pittsfield’s spiritual leader Dr. Rev. Heman Humphrey, canceled the festivities so the day could be dedicated to God before resuming in 1822 after residents decided they wanted their parade.

"Fighting for Independence: The History of the Pittsfield Fourth of July Parade" premiered July 4 at 9:30 am on PCTV Access Pittsfield Channel 1301 and PCTV Select.  The program is available on-demand on PCTV Select, available on Roku and Apple TV, or online.

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