Long Ball Does in SteepleCats in Double-Header Sweep

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LACONIA, N.H. -- The Winnipesaukee Muskrats earned a double-header sweep of the North Adams SteepleCats in New England Collegiate Baseball League on Sunday.
 
In Game One, Winnipesaukee hit three home runs Sunday to earn a 5-3 win.
 
Shane Muntz homered and drove in three runs for the 'Cats, who got a pair of hits from Andrew Pedone.
 
In the nightcap, the Muskrats got a couple more homers in a 9-8, come-from-behind win.
 
Winnipesaukee scored two runs in the bottom of the seventh. Jake Coro scored the winning run on a stolen base.
 
Joseph Porricelli hit his fourth homer of the summer in the loss, which also saw Matt Koperniak double in a run.
 
North Adams (20-14) visits the Valley Blue Sox on Monday.
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Baker Warns of Coronavirus Spread Through Younger Population

By Tammy DanielsiBerkshires Staff
BOSTON — The number of positive cases of COVID-19 in the over-60 crowd compared to the under-30s has flipped since April. 
 
While this is good news for the state's most at-risk residents, the rising number of cases of the novel coronavirus in younger people is concerning, say public officials, pointing to numerous social and sports gatherings with lax protocols as propelling the increase. 
 
"According to our most recent data, about 300 people per day under 30 have contracted COVID-19, tested positive for it, with about 38,000 people in this age group diagnosed since March," said Gov. Charlie Baker at Tuesday's update on the pandemic. "Rising cases in this demographic has implications.
 
"First, our contact tracing shows over half the commonwealths' new cases are attributed to housing social gatherings and household transmission. The science is quite clear that COVID spreads rapidly indoors, particularly in combined confined spaces when people aren't wearing face coverings are practicing social distancing. ...
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