Home About Archives RSS Feed

@theMarket: Investors Discover Value Stocks

By Bill Schmick
iBerkshires columnist
Value stocks, those equities that have fallen out of favor, have made a comeback this week. These underpriced orphans have become the new darlings of Wall Street, while high-flyers (think software and some tech) have sold off. What does this say about the markets?
 
The short answer is that we have more room to run. It means, in my opinion, that we will reach and break historical highs in the U.S. averages and that we should have fairly smooth sailing into October. If, at that point, there are breakthroughs in the trade issue and the Federal Reserve Bank cuts interest rates, we could see the markets continue climbing. If, on the other hand, Trump trashes Chinese exports again and/or the Fed disappoints, than be prepared for a rout.
 
Now, let's handicap this binary event. If one asks Corporate America what's the chances of a deal, some 65 percent of Chief Financial Officers would tell you there is no hope of a deal over the next six months. That was the results of a CNBC Global CFO Council survey released on Friday. The survey included some of the largest public and private companies in the world.
 
This echoes what has become consensus among investors. The Chinese will wait until after the elections next year before striking a deal in the hopes that Trump loses the election. As a contrarian, that bothers me, so I started looking for what could go right in this area.
 
This week the White House floated an idea, first denied, and then confirmed. Trump is considering an "interim" trade deal with the Chinese. To me, that makes sense. It allows the president an escape hatch in a trap of his own making. He can claim a shallow victory (but more than anyone else has been able to win from the Chinese) by announcing a deal before the elections. Yes, it may simply be the same deal that the Chinese offered him a year ago, which begs the question of why he didn't take it a year ago and save investors and the world so much anguish? In any case, the tariffs could then be set aside, allowing companies and the economy to recover from a burden they have been under for the last two years.
 
Of course, President Trump (and everyone else) would rather get a whole trade deal with China, but why not settle for half a loaf and worry about the rest after the election next year? Several additional actions this week support my argument.
 
First, the president announced he would delay the imposition of tariffs on another $250 billion in Chinese exports "for two weeks." In response, the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, headed by Beijing's hard-liner, Minister Zhong Shan, said it will exempt U.S. agricultural products, such as soybean and pork from additional tariffs.  These products have been added to 16 other types of U.S. imports that will be exempt from tariffs.
 
Does anyone sense a deal in the making?
 
As for the Fed, I expect at least a 25 basis-point cut in the Fed Funds interest rate. Now that the European Central Bank announced a new stimulus program this week (see yesterday's column on the event), the pressure is on for our central bankers to at least act a bit more dovish.
 
But back to value stocks and their recent outperformance. Recently, the price divergence between value and momentum/growth stocks has been greater than at any time since the 1990s. The same holds for small-cap companies versus large-caps. The darlings of the investment world, the FANG stocks, for example, have carried the stock market higher for years. A rotation into the sectors that have largely been ignored by investors makes sense to me.
 
As such, the averages that most investors use to gauge performance may not be telling the whole story. Basic materials, industrials, small cap, even commodities, may outperform, while the growth and momentum names could underperform, at least in the short-term until they catch-up to the markets in terms of valuation.
 
Bill Schmick is registered as an investment adviser representative and portfolio manager with Berkshire Money Management (BMM), managing over $400 million for investors in the Berkshires.  Bill's forecasts and opinions are purely his own. None of the information presented here should be construed as an endorsement of BMM or a solicitation to become a client of BMM. Direct inquiries to Bill at 1-888-232-6072 (toll free) or email him at Bill@afewdollarsmore.com.
 

 

0 Comments
     

Support Local News

We show up at hurricanes, budget meetings, high school games, accidents, fires and community events. We show up at celebrations and tragedies and everything in between. We show up so our readers can learn about pivotal events that affect their communities and their lives.

How important is local news to you? You can support independent, unbiased journalism and help iBerkshires grow for as a little as the cost of a cup of coffee a week.

News Headlines
Fall Foliage Leaf Hunt Winners 2019
2019 Fall Foliage & Children's Parade Float and Band Winners
Women's Political Caucus Endorses North Adams, Pittsfield Candidates
Election 2019 Debates & Candidate Forums
Baseball in the Berkshires Presents 'Batmania' Talk
Bishop Homers in Greylock Thunder Win
Williamstown Select Board Seeks New Proposal on Parking Regulations
Greylock Federal Credit Union Reopens Kellogg Street Branch
North Adams Happenings: Oct. 23-29
Trick-or-Treat, Halloween Events 2019

Bill Schmick is registered as an investment advisor representative and portfolio manager with Berkshire Money Management (BMM), managing over $200 million for investors in the Berkshires. Bill’s forecasts and opinions are purely his own and do not necessarily represent the views of BMM. None of his commentary is or should be considered investment advice. Anyone seeking individualized investment advice should contact a qualified investment adviser. None of the information presented in this article is intended to be and should not be construed as an endorsement of BMM or a solicitation to become a client of BMM. The reader should not assume that any strategies, or specific investments discussed are employed, bought, sold or held by BMM. Direct your inquiries to Bill at 1-888-232-6072 (toll free) or email him at Bill@afewdollarsmore.com Visit www.afewdollarsmore.com for more of Bill’s insights.

 

 

 



Categories:
@theMarket (305)
Independent Investor (416)
Archives:
October 2019 (6)
October 2018 (2)
September 2019 (7)
August 2019 (5)
July 2019 (5)
June 2019 (8)
May 2019 (10)
April 2019 (7)
March 2019 (7)
February 2019 (6)
January 2019 (6)
December 2018 (4)
November 2018 (9)
Tags:
Crisis Fiscal Cliff Congress Housing Wall Street Rally Markets Greece Currency Euro Debt Ceiling Federal Reserve Europe Europe Debt Energy Stock Market Banks Metals Selloff Oil Interest Rates Deficit Pullback Jobs Taxes Retirement Economy Election Stocks Recession Commodities Japan Bailout Stimulus
Popular Entries:
The Independent Investor: Don't Fight the Fed
@theMarket: QE II Supports the Markets
The Independent Investor: Understanding the Foreclosure Scandal
The Independent Investor: Does Cash Mean Currencies?
@theMarket: Markets Are Going Higher
The Independent Investor: General Motors — Back to the Future
@theMarket: Economy Sputters, Stocks Stutter
The Independent Investor: How Will Wall Street II Play on Main Street?
The Independent Investor: Why Are Interest Rates Rising?
The Independent Investor: Will the Municipal Bond Massacre Continue?
Recent Entries:
@theMarket: Markets Await a Brexit Vote
The Independent Investor: Was There Really a Trade Deal?
@theMarket: Stocks Soar on 'Skinny' Deal
The Independent Investor: Brokerage Business Not What It Used to Be
@theMarket: An October to Remember
The Independent Investor: Markets Bogged Down by Politics
@theMarkets: Markets Muddle Through
The Independent Investor: India's Bid for More Trade
The Independent Investor: The Era of U.S. Oil Independence
@theMarket: Investors Discover Value Stocks