Williams Professor Wins Award Astronomy Research and Education

Print Story | Email Story

WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — Williams College astronomy professor Jay Pasachoff has received the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's Klumpke-Roberts Award.

The award is given to an individual or individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the public understanding and appreciation of astronomy.

Pasachoff’s passion and dedication to the field of astronomy goes beyond his main role as professor and researcher, touching numerous people across all generations. He wrote, in the Peterson Field Guide series, the popular "A Field Guide to the Stars and Planets," now in the 17th printing of its 4th edition; is lead author of "The Cosmos: Astronomy in the New Millennium," now in its 5th edition; is coauthor with an art historian of "Cosmos: The Art and Science of the Universe," a new book on the intersection of art and astronomy; and hundreds of articles, textbooks, and conference series contributions, instilling a love of astronomy to laypersons and students all over the world.

His solar-eclipse expeditions, including 35 total eclipses, and primary research in solar eclipses, has led to not only scientific articles but also popular articles in National Geographic, Scientific American, and elsewhere, as well as media appearances before and after the August 21, 2017, solar eclipse in the United States. As one nominator praised after the eclipse: "It is during these moments that Jay becomes astronomy's cheerleader-in-chief, allowing more and more people to become interested and engaged in the field."



Pasachoff's leadership roles served within the profession have brought him distinction and acknowledgment as one of only 15 honorary members of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, and the Education Prize of the American Astronomical Society. He has also received the 2017 Richtmyer Memorial Lecture Award from the American Association of Physics Teachers and the 2012 Prix-Jules-Janssen of the Société Astronomique de France. He is acknowledged as having inspired future writers and astronomers, sometimes turning nonscientists into professional astronomical lives of significance. His exuberance for sharing his passion of the universe has created many passionate astronomers.

His research on the sun is currently supported by a grant from the Solar Terrestrial Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation. He has also held National Geographic and NASA research grants.

One nominator summed up how "Jay Pasachoff has devoted his entire career to fathoming the universe while bringing all of us along with him in the endeavor. For more than a half a century, he has investigated, communicated, and educated – and done so with success, humility, and humor."

 


Tags: Williams College,   

0 Comments
iBerkshires.com welcomes critical, respectful dialogue; please keep comments focused on the issues and not on personalities. Profanity, obscenity, racist language and harassment are not allowed. iBerkshires reserves the right to ban commenters or remove commenting on any article at any time. Concerns may be sent to info@iberkshires.com.

New Williams Inn Opens on Spring Street

By Tammy DanielsiBerkshires Staff

Chef Kevin DeMarco has put together a menu informed by local produce. He is part of leadership team appointed by Waterford Hotel Group, which manages the hotel for Williams College.
WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — The new Williams Inn is positioned to be a catalyst for the town's retail center on Spring Street as well as a bucolic retreat for guests — as exampled by the deer grazing near the patio this week.  
 
"We really want to be an indoor/outdoor experience," said Kevin Hurley, the inn's general manager, during a press preview just days before the hotel's opening on Thursday. "We will see a lot of those features, again with the windows, and just the way the hotel feels is really connecting ourselves to the outside." 
 
The $32 million, 64-room hotel at the bottom of Spring and Latham streets replaces the 100-room original hotel at Field Park that closed on July 31. The older inn, purchased by Williams College in 2014, was considered outdated and energy inefficient for an institution that's committed itself to sustainability. 
 
That commitment can be seen throughout the 58,000 square-foot three-story New England-style structure — from its reclaimed wood to its high-performance facade and solar PV array. 
View Full Story

More Williamstown Stories