Pittsfield Police Investigating Three Car Accident On South Street.

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PITTSFIELD, Mass. — A three car accident on South Street, in which one driver was charged for speeding, leaves two with minor injuries.

On Saturday, Jan. 9 around 3:12 pm Pittsfield Police Department, Pittsfield Fire Department and County Ambulance responded to the intersection of South Street and South Mountain Road for a report of a vehicle accident with unknown injuries. 
 
As a result of the preliminary investigation, it was determined the driver of a 2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee, identified as 35 year old Matthew Arico of Cheshire, was traveling northbound on South Street and struck the rear of a 2016 Toyota Camry, operated by 31 year old Ryan Harmon of Pittsfield. This impact pushed Harmon's vehicle into the rear of a 2014 Toyota Corolla, being operated by 57 year old Gina Squires of Dalton.
 
Investigation showed Harmon's and Squires' vehicles were stopped or had just started forward traveling northbound at the intersection when Arico struck the rear of Harmon's vehicle. 
 
Based on the amount of damage to the vehicles, it is believed Arico was traveling higher than posted speed limit. 
 
Arico and Harmon were transported by County Ambulance to Berkshire Medical Center for treatment of non-life threatening injuries. Squires refused medical transport at the scene. 
 
Northbound traffic was diverted at Dan Fox Drive while the accident was cleared and the roadway was opened up at approximately 4:00 PM. Arico was cited with failing to use care and speeding. 
 
The accident remains under investigation by the Pittsfield Police Traffic Unit. Anyone who may have witnessed the accident is asked to contact Officer David Hallas at 448-9700 Ext. 560 

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MassWildlife Asks Public Not to Feed 'GE Deer'

By Brittany PolitoiBerkshires Staff

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — If you have ever driven down New York Avenue and seen the deer grazing behind the fencing that encases General Electric's property, it is likely that you have been inclined to feed them.

Though this action is rooted in kindness, it is not healthy for the woodland friends and could be fatal, which is why MassWildlife has put up signs asking that residents do not throw food over the fences.

"Obviously, people see the deer in there and they probably think 'what are they going to eat? They're limited in there they're stuck in there.'  I will say, they're definitely not stuck in there," MassWildlife's wildlife biologist Nathan Buckhout said.

For decades, the deer have found an unlikely sanctuary in the former GE site that includes two landfills, Hill 78 and Building 71. Buckhout explained that they have been there for decades, spawning offspring and becoming completely self-sufficient within the fenced area.

"They're doing just fine," he said. "And they obviously are getting enough food and water, otherwise their population would be limited, they wouldn't be able to produce their offspring so there would be fewer fawns, and eventually they probably would have disappeared — but they haven't."

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