Home About Archives RSS Feed

@theMarket: Market's Window Getting Smaller

By Bill Schmick
iBerkshires columnist
This week the benchmark S&P 500 Index made a minor new high for the year. While that is cause to celebrate, the question to ask is how much further can we climb in the face of a slowing economy before suffering a meaningful pullback?
 
Over the last few months, investors have been warned by just about every economist worth their salt that the country needs another jolt of federal stimulus. It has not happened. You can cast blame on whomever you want for that failure, but none of that matters to the over one million American workers who lost their jobs in the past week. 
 
Even the Federal Reserve Bank, in releasing its July 28-29 Federal Open Market Committee meeting notes, expressed concern over the future of the economy. The members warned investors that the coronavirus would likely continue to stunt growth and potentially pose dangers to the financial system. They too have been urging the government to add more fiscal stimulus to the equation. 
 
The longer it takes for Congress to respond to this urgent need, the smaller the window becomes for the market’s continued advance. Right now, most observers do not expect even a "skinny" stimulus deal to be passed before September at the earliest.
 
When thinking back to the financial crisis of over a decade ago, I recall it took a fairly substantial decline in the averages to convince the politicians to take action. Could that happen again? Unfortunately, some of the conditions for just such a response are present.
 
As I mentioned, investors have regained all their market losses and are now basically even for the year. At the same time, valuations are stretched, given the present recessionary state of the economy. Investors have paid scant attention to fundamentals during the pandemic. Companies have been given a pass even though they have been reporting horrendous sales and earnings results, but at some point, they may matter again.
 
It was more than interesting that the markets and gold sold off on Wednesday after the FOMC notes were released. Remember, the financier markets have been wholly dependent on the Fed to bail them out ever since the March bottom. Therefore, when the Fed publicly states that they are worried about the future, markets pay attention. 
 
If we look at the most recent U.S. Advisors Sentiment for this week, we find that bullish sentiment (usually a contrary indicator) is at their highest level (59.2 percent) since mid-January of 2020.  What's more, the spread between bulls and bears is at 42.7 percent. That number exceeds the spread in mid-January. Numbers like that are a warning sign to prepare for some kind of downdraft in the stock market.  It may not occur this week, or next, but usually one can expect a sell-off within a month or so. And while these are different times and circumstances, I think readers would do well to pay attention to indicators like this.
 
By the way, my apologies for last week's column. I had expected a trade meeting between Chinese and U.S. officials last weekend, but it was postponed shortly after my column was published. Evidently, the meeting is now back on track, although no date has been set for the virtual review of the Phase One trade deal. However, if anything, the tension between the two parties have increased since then, so I will be paying close attention to the outcome of that meeting.
 

Bill Schmick is now the 'Retired Investor.' After working in the financial services business for more than 40 years, Bill is paring back and focusing exclusively on writing about the financial markets, the needs of retired investors like himself, and how to make your last 30 years of your life your absolute best. You can reach him at billiams1948@gmail.com or leave a message at 413-347-2401.

 

0 Comments
     

Support Local News

We show up at hurricanes, budget meetings, high school games, accidents, fires and community events. We show up at celebrations and tragedies and everything in between. We show up so our readers can learn about pivotal events that affect their communities and their lives.

How important is local news to you? You can support independent, unbiased journalism and help iBerkshires grow for as a little as the cost of a cup of coffee a week.

News Headlines
Pittsfield Developing Plan for Bicycle Network
Children Learn About Wildlife at Richmond Free Library
PHS Names 57 AP Scholars
Berkshire United Way Hires Director of Donor Engagement
Mount Greylock District Enrollment Down, School-Year Start Survey Positive
BArT Upcoming Enrollment Deadlines
North Adams, BRPC Loan Programs Designed to Aid Small Business
MCLA Police Investigating A Series Of Larcenies From Vehicles
Cheshire To Test CodeRED System
 
 


Categories:
@theMarket (347)
Independent Investor (450)
Retired Investor (17)
Archives:
October 2020 (6)
October 2019 (2)
September 2020 (6)
August 2020 (6)
July 2020 (10)
June 2020 (7)
May 2020 (9)
April 2020 (9)
March 2020 (5)
February 2020 (7)
January 2020 (10)
December 2019 (7)
November 2019 (8)
Tags:
Taxes Banks Crisis Housing Federal Reserve Markets Congress Recession Interest Rates Pullback Retirement Europe Selloff Europe Commodities Euro Stocks Stimulus Rally Bailout Japan Metals Debt Ceiling Currency Fiscal Cliff Deficit Election Oil Economy Stock Market Energy Wall Street Greece Debt Jobs
Popular Entries:
The Independent Investor: Don't Fight the Fed
@theMarket: QE II Supports the Markets
The Independent Investor: Understanding the Foreclosure Scandal
@theMarket: Markets Are Going Higher
The Independent Investor: Does Cash Mean Currencies?
The Independent Investor: General Motors — Back to the Future
@theMarket: Economy Sputters, Stocks Stutter
The Independent Investor: How Will Wall Street II Play on Main Street?
The Independent Investor: Why Are Interest Rates Rising?
The Independent Investor: Will the Municipal Bond Massacre Continue?
Recent Entries:
@theMarket: Politicians Play Cat & Mouse With Investors
@theMarket: Investors Reduce Risk as Stimulus Talks Fail
The Retired Investor: China Leads Global Economic Recovery
@theMarket: One way or Another, Markets Expect More Stimulus
The Retired Investor: U.S. Moves to Nail Down Strategic Metals
The Retired Investor: Halloween Could Be the Holiday Test Case
@theMarket: Markets Feel the Heat
The Retired Investor: Back to the Future in America's kitchens
@theMarket: Investors Face a Rollercoaster Ride
The Retired Investor: Bicycles Sales Are Booming