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James and Kim Taylor have a long history in the Berkshires, where James Taylor has his music studio.

Taylors Donate $350K to Launch BMC COVID-19 Relief Fund

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PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Kim and James Taylor have donated $350,000 to Berkshire Medical Center to bolster the hospital's efforts in fighting the ongoing battle to stop COVID-19. 
 
The gift, announced Monday by BMC, will be the inaugural donation establishing the COVID-19 Relief Fund for Berkshire Health Systems, which will be used by BHS to fight the rapidly escalating public health crisis.
 
''My wife, Kim, and I have both pursued careers that have included a good deal of global travel. While we also spend a good deal of time in Boston, our favorite place to live our lives is Berkshire County," James Taylor said in a statement for both. "We are so lucky and grateful to have found a home here. In this time of great uncertainty and dire threat due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all called upon to support our heroic health-care providers. Their contribution and sacrifice cannot be over-stated."
 
The Taylors' gift to the COVID-19 Relief Fund will support BMC's emergency operations and ongoing efforts to care for the Berkshire County community during the pandemic.
 
"The generosity of Kim and James Taylor during this time of crisis is just one more example of their tremendous kindness and their love for the Berkshires," said David Phelps, president and CEO of Berkshire Health Systems.
 
The Taylors both have a long history with the Berkshires. An award-winning singer/songwriter, James has performed most of Tanglewood's July 4 concerts since 1974. 
 
He has recorded his albums "October Road," "Before This World," and most recently, "American Standard" at his Berkshire studio, The Barn. The Barn was also where he recorded "Break Shot" — his recently released Audible Original audio book detailing his first 21 years. His "One Man Band" album and PBS Special was recorded and filmed at the Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield in 2007.
 
Kim is currently a trustee of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and began her work with the BSO at Tanglewood in 1980. She worked closely with Seiji Ozawa and John Williams during her tenure, having been hired by Peter Gelb, then working for the BSO and now the Metropolitan Opera's general manager. With Gelb and Ozawa, Kim worked on establishing Ozawa's Saito Kinen Festival in Matsumoto, Japan, patterned after Tanglewood and the Salzburg Festival.
 
"Their support of BMC is truly a gift to our community, which depends on the hospital to rise to the occasion and provide the healthcare we need, especially at this critical moment."  Phelps said. "We share the Taylors' admiration for our doctors, nurses, and all our staff who are on the front lines of this fight. The COVID-19 Relief Fund will help us to continue our efforts to provide healthcare workers with the resources they need to treat and contain the novel coronavirus."
 
Berkshire Medical Center, an affiliate of Berkshire Health Systems, is a 298-bed community teaching hospital serving the residents of Berkshire County and the neighboring areas. As the region's leading health-care provider, Berkshire Health Systems' mission is to improve the health of all people in the Berkshires and surrounding communities, regardless of their ability to pay.
 
To support Berkshire Health Systems in its fight against the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), visit www.berkshirehealthsystems.org/COVID19ReliefFund.

Tags: BMC,   COVID-19,   


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BCC Graduates Recognized in Remote Commencement

By Tammy DanielsiBerkshires Staff

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Any other year, the graduates of Berkshire Community College and their friends and families would be filling The Shed at Tanglewood in Lenox.

 
But instead of taking the stage, speakers stood alone in front of a backdrop. And instead of being handed their certificates and diplomas, the more than 200 graduates' names were read as their pictures were shown. 
 
What didn't change was the ceremony's broadcast on Pittsfield Community Television, allowing at least a virtual coming together of the BCC community to mark their significant accomplishments.
 
President Ellen Kennedy reminded those watching how commencement celebrates not just the achievements but the persistence of the graduates in often overcoming life challenges to walk across the Tanglewod stage.   
 
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