image description
Lenox High students are selling saplings to offset their use of paper.

Lenox Students Planting Trees to Offset Paper Use

By Brittany PolitoiBerkshires Staff
Print Story | Email Story

The school is partnering with Tree-plenish, which started at Mansfield High School. Here Mansfield students Peter Oldow, Will Giffen, and Cam Eddy are ready to plant last year.
LENOX, Mass. — Lenox Memorial High School students want to plant 100 trees as a way to replace one million sheets of paper.
 
And they're looking for help from the community to purchase the saplings and plant them on April 24.  
 
"Basically we're trying to offset our school's paper usage by getting people to buy trees and then getting volunteers to come with us to go plant them in their homes," said student Sabrina Lewis. "I'm really excited, but also, we do need people to buy more trees."
 
Community members can buy an 18 inch to 24 inch red maple or river birch sapling for $5, which includes delivery and COVID-19 safe planting. 
 
The goal is to replace the estimated million sheets of paper that the school uses each year. Students have already sold around 21 trees.
 
This event was organized by the school's Climate Crisis Control Club in partnership with Massachusetts non-profit organization Tree-Plenish, which began as a senior project in Mansfield and now reaches around 20 states. The student-led nonprofit says it's on target to plant 14,000 trees through partnerships with 90 schools. 
 
The club was started by Lewis and classmate Medeja Rudzinskaite last year and currently has around 13 members.
    
"Even though we're remote now and we use less trees, we're still trying to offset our usage from previous years," Rudzinskaite said.
 
Tree-Plenish reached out to Grade 9 world literature teacher Scott Wade at the beginning of the school year and the club was happy to partner with it.
 
Wade explained that the club is also planning an Earth Day cleanup to beautify local spaces and have a few other projects in the works. Earth Day is on Thursday, April 22.
 
He said this project has also made him realize that many class handouts could be replaced with a Google document or other virtual rendering.

Saplings can be purchased at tree-plenishevents.org/lenox.

 

 


Tags: Lenox Memorial,   trees,   

0 Comments
iBerkshires.com welcomes critical, respectful dialogue; please keep comments focused on the issues and not on personalities. Profanity, obscenity, racist language and harassment are not allowed. iBerkshires reserves the right to ban commenters or remove commenting on any article at any time. Concerns may be sent to info@iberkshires.com.

Pittsfield Hydrant Flushing To Begin

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — The City of Pittsfield's Department of Public Utilities announced that the annual flushing of the city water system will begin Monday, April 26. 
 
Water mains throughout the city will be flushed through hydrants over the course of four weeks to remove accumulations of pipeline corrosion products. Mains will be flushed Monday through Friday each week, except holidays, between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.
 
The upcoming flushing for the week of April 26 may be expected to affect the following areas:
  • Starting at the town line on Dalton Avenue working west through Coltsville including lower Crane Avenue, Meadowview neighborhood, following Cheshire Road north.
  • Hubbard Avenue and Downing Parkway.
  • Starting at the town line on East Street working west through the McIntosh and Parkside neighborhoods.
  • Elm Street neighborhoods west to the intersection of East Street.
  • Starting at the town line on Williams Street working west including Mountain Drive, Ann Drive, East New Lenox Road and Holmes Road neighborhoods.
Although flushing may cause localized discolored water and reduced service pressure conditions in and around the immediate area of flushing, appropriate measures will be taken to ensure that proper levels of treatment and disinfections are maintained in the system at all times. If customers experience discolored water, they should let the water run for a short period to clear it prior to use.
 
View Full Story

More Pittsfield Stories