Explore Allyship in the Workplace

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PITTSFIELD, Mass.— Join a conversation on The Fundamentals of Allyship: Is It Active in Your Workplace? at the Dulye Leadership Experience (DLE) Culture Chat virtual program on Jan. 21starting at noon. 
 
Subject matter expert Meg Bossong of Williams College will lead a moderated and honest discussion about building strong relationships in any organization. 
 
As Director of Intimate Violence Prevention & Response and Health Education at Williams College in Williamstown, Bossong has developed and implemented an array of advocacy programs with the goal of building just and equitable organizations. 
 
Regarded as "a strategic mechanism" for combating bias and promoting equity, allyship builds knowledge and awareness in those who experience the benefits of privilege in a professional context, and involves building the skills to move from awareness to action and advocacy.
 
Meg will share her expertise on what it means to be an ally and how to advocate for structures that promote allyship in your workplace. Breakout sessions will be included to promote active networking.
 
The Culture Chat program runs an hour. Registration is free thanks to the sustained sponsorship of Dulye & Co., an organizational effectiveness consultancy based in the Berkshires.
 
To reserve your virtual seat, click on:
 
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BEAT: Conserving Flowers and their Pollinators

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Joan Edwards will speak at the May Pittsfield Green Drinks event on Tuesday, May 17th at 6:00 PM and give a slideshow presentation about the rapidly decreasing biodiversity that is taking place globally, known as the sixth extinction. 
 
She will specifically focus on flowers and their insect visitors. 
 
This sixth extinction is primarily driven by human actions, from habitat loss to climate change. The impacts of biodiversity loss are far-reaching, resulting in biological communities that are less resilient and with diminished ecosystems services. As part of the discussion, Joan will explore the impact of biodiversity loss in the pollinator-flower world and examine how the surprising dynamics of flower-pollinator networks can help to conserve both flowers and their pollinators.
 
Joan Edwards is a botanist interested in understanding the biomechanics and adaptive significance of ultra-fast plant movements—plant actions that are so quick they occur in milliseconds. Using high-speed video (up to 100,000 fps), she studies the evolutionary significance and biomechanics of fast movements, including the trebuchet catapults of bunchberry dogwood, the vortex rings of Sphagnum moss, the splash cups of liverworts, and the "poppers" of wood sorrel. Her early fieldwork was on the impact of moose on plants in the boreal forests of Isle Royale National Park. 
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