CGI Studio: Film Credit Change Could Generate Jobs

By Tammy DanielsiBerkshires Staff
Print Story | Email Story

Walt Disney Studios
The state's film tax credit helped Synthespian Studios nab the CGI work on 'Surrogates.' The studio is hoping to extend the credit to attract investors to fund a feature animated film - and jobs for North Adams.
NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — A change in the state's film tax incentive could bring hundreds of jobs to the city.

That's the prediction of Synthespian Studios owner Jeff Kleiser, who's hoping to ramp up production on a full-length animated feature film right here.

"We have a script and completed the very early stages of preproduction," said Kleiser on Thursday afternoon. The movie would be based on the studio's Corkscrew Hill ride through Irish myths in Busch Gardens in Virginia. "We're interested in doing it all in Massachusetts."

But Kleiser said he could really use a longer-term tax credit to get investors lined up for his $60 million project.

The tax credits were established in 2005 and expanded in 2007 to lure production companies to film in the Bay State. They've been a rousing success, bringing in $3.6 million more in revenue than they cost and generating from $500 million to $900 million in ancillary revenue and thousands of jobs, according to the state Department of Revenue.

The number of major films being shot in Massachusetts more than doubled, from 10 films in seven years to 26 in the three years since the credits were enacted.

However, the credits — ranging from sales tax exemptions to payroll deductions, up to $7 million — only apply to films shot in the state within a 12-month period. Synthespian's "filming" could take 18 months, said Kleiser.


So he was at the Joint Committee on Revenue's listening-tour stop at Berkshire Community College on Wednesday to laud the program — and to ask for help.

"It's been very good for us," he told committee Chairmen Sen. Benjamin B. Downing, D-Pittsfield, and Rep. Jay R. Kaufman, D-Lexington. "Disney came to us to work on the 'Surrogates' project because we were in Massachusetts and they were shooting in Massachusetts. We got a $2.5 million contract based on that program."

Synthespian, previously known as Kleiser-Walczak Construction Co., specializes in groundbreaking computer-generated imagery. In addition to making Bruce Willis look like a 30-year-old android version of himself in "Surrogates," the company's worked on such films "Spider-Man" and "X-Men." At one point, nearly 100 people were working for the studio in North Berkshire.

Downing said on Wednesday that the 12-month time limit may have to do with the Legislature "trying to avoid the cost being beyond what the state could afford." Kleiser suggested Thursday that it may have more to do with the way live-action films are shot on location and then finished elsewhere.

"We really want to bring people here. That's perfect for us because we wouldn't have to go to another state," he said on Thursday. The company has a larger studio in Los Angeles but Kleiser and wife and partner Diana Walczak have called the area home for years. The film tax credit program has been a factor in keeping them here the last few years, said Kleiser.

Working on the Corkscrew Hill project could generate 250 to 300 jobs for 18 months to two years on the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art campus. Kleiser said the company would try to fill its work force locally first before recruiting outside.

"We can certainly look into that especially when you say 250 to 300 jobs," said Downing. "I'm not kidding," said Kleiser. "I'm not kidding either," responded the senator.
0 Comments
iBerkshires.com welcomes critical, respectful dialogue; please keep comments focused on the issues and not on personalities. Profanity, obscenity, racist language and harassment are not allowed. iBerkshires reserves the right to ban commenters or remove commenting on any article at any time. Concerns may be sent to info@iberkshires.com.

State Declares 'Green Friday' in Support of Local Xmas Tree Farms

UXBRIDGE, Mass. — The Baker-Polito administration has declared Friday, Nov. 27, as "Green Friday" to encourage people across the commonwealth to visit their local farms and nurseries for Christmas trees, holiday plants, and holiday decorating needs.
 
To celebrate, state Department of Agricultural Resources Commissioner John Lebeaux participated in a Christmas tree-cutting ceremony at Arrowhead Acres in Uxbridge. In an effort to support the commonwealth's Christmas tree industry, the declaration of Green Friday encourages people throughout the state to visit their local Christmas tree farms to purchase their trees, holiday plants, ornamental swags, and wreaths to fulfill their holiday decorating needs.
 
"Our administration believes in the importance of supporting our farms by shopping locally and purchasing holiday decorations from one of the commonwealth's many family-operated Christmas tree farms," said Gov. Charlie Baker. "Now more than ever, it is a great time to spend quality time with your family while partaking in this outdoor activity which allows for proper social distancing."
 
Christmas tree season in Massachusetts provides hundreds of seasonal jobs at approximately 264 Christmas tree farms on approximately 2,801 acres of land from Cape Cod to the Berkshires. The sale of more than 82,524 state-grown Christmas trees contributes approximately $3.5 million to the commonwealth's economy each year. Christmas tree farms, which are often sited on soils that cannot support other crops, stabilize soil, which helps prevent erosion and protect water supplies. When chipped, the trees can be used as a renewable source of energy to be burned as fuel, used as mulch, or composted.
View Full Story

More North Adams Stories