SVMC ExpressCare Practice Welcomes Family Nurse Practitioner

Print Story | Email Story

BENNINGTON, Vt. — Southwestern Vermont Medical Center's ExpressCare in Bennington has welcomed family nurse practitioner Christine Burke. With this appointment, Burke also joins the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Putnam Medical Group.

Burke earned her master's degree in nursing from Simmons University in Massachusetts. She received her bachelor's in nursing from the University of Vermont and is a member of the Sigma Theta Tau Nursing Honor Society. She is certified by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

Most recently, Burke worked as a registered nurse at Rutland Regional Medical Center Diagnostic Imaging and Infusion and at Castleton Family Health Center Urgent Care in Castleton, Vt. She also worked in the Emergency Department at Rutland Regional Medical Center.

Open seven days a week, including holidays, except Thanksgiving and Christmas, ExpressCare is a convenient walk-in medical office. No appointment is necessary. ExpressCare offers care for minor illnesses and injuries to patients of all ages. Patients may seek care at Suite 111 of the Medical Office Building at 140 Hospital Drive. For more information, call 802-440-4077.


Tags: SVMC,   

0 Comments
iBerkshires.com welcomes critical, respectful dialogue; please keep comments focused on the issues and not on personalities. Profanity, obscenity, racist language and harassment are not allowed. iBerkshires reserves the right to ban commenters or remove commenting on any article at any time. Concerns may be sent to info@iberkshires.com.

PRP: New Treatment for Osteoarthritis

By Dr. Ivette Guttmann

For years, treatment options for osteoarthritis (OA) were rather limited: exercise, anti-inflammatory drugs, cortisone injections, physical therapy and, in extreme cases, joint replacement. But a new treatment option is showing great promise and offering much-needed relief to some sufferers.

Platelet-rich plasma, or PRP for short, has been found effective for reducing pain and increasing function in joints affected by osteoarthritis. Best of all, it uses your body's own resources and healing powers to create change.

In short, PRP therapy involves taking some of a patient's blood and running it through a high-tech centrifuge to extract platelets and plasma. The resulting mixture is the PRP and it contains a concentration of natural growth factors and healing proteins. Then, using guided ultrasound, the PRP is injected into the affected joint to stimulate tendon and muscle regeneration. The PRP then goes to work not only healing but also recruiting other growth factors and proteins to keep the healing process going.

As for results, a recent study found that patients who received PRP had significant pain reduction and improved physical function over the course of a year.

View Full Story

More Vermont Stories