image description
Susan B. Anthony, created by sculptor Brian Hanlon, awaits her pedestal on the Town Common. The unveiling of the statue was to be the culmination of a yearlong event celebrating the voting rights advocate and the 19th Amendment.
image description
image description

Susan B. Anthony Statue Installed in Adams

Staff ReportsiBerkshires
Print Story | Email Story
ADAMS, Mass. — There was supposed to be fanfare and celebration, speeches and parades. 
 
But then came COVID-19. 
 
The town of Adams was set to commemorate native daughter Susan B. Anthony and the centennial of the passage of the 19th Amendment securing women's right to vote. The yearlong observance began in February with the serenading of Anthony on her 200th birthday.
 
The Adams Suffrage Centennial Celebration Committee had been working for more than two years to celebrate the 100th anniversary of women gaining the right to vote along with Anthony's bicentennial. The celebration was going to culminate in August with a weekend's worth of activities including live music, a food truck festival, fireworks and a parade all leading up to the unveiling and dedication on the town common of a statue of the Adams born suffragette made by world-renowned sculptor Brian Hanlon.
 
All that pomp and circumstance has been put off until next year but the installation of Anthony's statue has gone as planned. 
 
Hanlon's bronze was being put into place on Tuesday morning at the Town Common, which is also undergoing an update that was to be completed more than a month ago. The delays caused by the novel coronavirus pandemic pushed it to later in the year but most of the most of the work is expected to be completed before winter. 
 
The new common at the south end of Park Street is getting new pathways, a new gazebo in the eastern corner and a small plaza featuring the Susan B. Anthony memorial. 
 
The monument is made up of three pieces — a stepped granite base, the adult Anthony orating (she crisscrossed the nation during her adulthood giving 75 to 100 speeches a year on the subject of suffrage), and Anthony as a child sitting on the lower steps of the base.
 
The civil rights activist was born on East Road and lived there until her family moved when she was 6. She died in 1906, 14 years before the final passage of what is often called the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. She frequently returned to Adams to visit relatives whose descendants still live in the area. Her birthplace is now a museum.

Tags: Susan B. Anthony,   

0 Comments
iBerkshires.com welcomes critical, respectful dialogue; please keep comments focused on the issues and not on personalities. Profanity, obscenity, racist language and harassment are not allowed. iBerkshires reserves the right to ban commenters or remove commenting on any article at any time. Concerns may be sent to info@iberkshires.com.

BArT Students Receive John and Abigail Adams Scholarships

ADAMS, Mass. — 13 Berkshire Arts and Technology Charter School students received John and Abigail Adams Scholarship
 
The John and Abigail Adams Scholarship provides merit-based credit toward tuition for up to eight semesters of undergraduate education at a Massachusetts state college or university. The scholarship covers tuition only, fees and room and board are not included.
 
This year's recipients are: Aiyanna Bellefeuille, Emma Danylin, Maya Gayle, Miranda-Ann Grant, Kyle Gwilt, Lindsey Gwilt, Olivia Jayko, Cameron Langsdale, Diego Mongue, Damian Nixon-Longdyke, Kassondra Stockmal, Charles Waltermire, and Molly Weeks
 
In order to be eligible for the scholarship students must:
View Full Story

More Adams Stories