Mass Taxpayers Getting Money Back

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BOSTON — Taxpayers are expected to get more than 10 percent back of the income tax they paid into the state for last year. 
 
Gov. Charlie Baker said Friday that state will be returning nearly $3 billion in excess revenue to taxpayers this November. 
 
"Stronger-than expected state tax revenues have led to a major surplus for fiscal year 2022, and we are pleased to be able to return nearly $3 billion in excess revenue to the taxpayers," said the governor. "With families facing continued pressure from high prices and inflation, these returns will provide some needed relief. Even with nearly $3 billion going back to taxpayers, significant state and federal resources remain, and we look forward to working with the Legislature to invest this funding into our economy, communities and families."
 
His actions follow state auditor's certification on Thursday that Fiscal Year 2022 (FY22) net state tax revenues exceeded allowable revenues per Chapter 62F by $2.941 billion.
 
"Strong economic growth throughout our commonwealth, combined with careful management of state tax dollars, has resulted in a significant surplus this past fiscal year," said Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito. "In the coming months, our administration will work diligently to distribute these funds back to taxpayers, and we look forward to working with the Legislature to invest additional surplus dollars in local economies across our state."
 
In accordance with the statute, the $2.941 billion will be returned to eligible taxpayers by the Department of Revenue in proportion to personal income tax liability in Massachusetts incurred in tax year 2021.
 
In general, eligible taxpayers will receive a credit in the form of a refund that is approximately 13 percent of their personal income tax liability for the 2021 tax year. This percentage is a preliminary estimate and will be finalized in late October, after all 2021 tax returns are filed. 
 
To be eligible, individuals must have filed a 2021 state tax return on or before Oct. 17, 2022. An individual's credit may be reduced due to refund intercepts, including for unpaid taxes, unpaid child support, and certain other debts.
 
Individuals eligible for a refund will receive it automatically as a check sent through the mail or through direct deposit. Distribution of refunds is expected to begin in November 2022.
 
"While the exceptionally high tax collections we saw in FY22 are a testament to the strength and resilience of the Massachusetts economy, we are pleased to be in a position to return a substantial portion of this revenue back to taxpayers," said Administration and Finance Secretary Michael J. Heffernan. "With many feeling the strain of rising prices, these refunds will be a welcome source of relief for more than three million hardworking individuals across the state, and we look forward to executing on the delivery of the refunds in the coming months."
 
In total, $41.812 billion was collected in FY22, representing overall revenue growth of more than 20 percent above fiscal 2021. After accounting for the Chapter 62F refunds and the recently filed $840 million final FY22 supplemental budget, a surplus of $1.5 billion remains available to support permanent tax relief measures and other critical investments pending in the FORWARD/economic development bill, in combination with $2.2 billion in remaining American Rescue Plan Act funds.
 
Additional information about Chapter 62F taxpayer refunds, including a FAQ and a refund estimator, is available at www.mass.gov/62frefunds. This website will be updated as additional information becomes available in the coming months. 
 
A call center will also be available to answer questions about 62F refunds beginning Tuesday, Sept. 20, at 877-677-9727 and will be open Monday through Friday, 9 to 4. The call center will not be able to provide exact refund amounts – however, the estimator on the FAQs page can help individuals calculate a preliminary estimate.  
 
Chapter 62F is a Massachusetts law enacted by voters in 1986 via a ballot question that requires the Department of Revenue to issue a credit to taxpayers if total tax revenues in a given fiscal year exceed an annual cap tied to wage and salary growth in the commonwealth. The Chapter 62F process has been triggered once before, in 1987.

 


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Berkshire County Regional Employment Board Awarded State Grant

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PITTSFIELD, Mass. — The Healey-Driscoll Administration announced $16.3 million in Workforce Competitiveness Trust Fund (WCTF) grants awarded to nine organizations to upskill 1,860 individuals for careers in high-demand occupations in healthcare and behavioral health sectors across Massachusetts. 
 
The funding will support initiatives to train and hire unemployed and underemployed individuals while providing current employees with the skills to meet the needs of Massachusetts employers for roles such as Emergency Medical Technician, Certified Nurse Assistant, and Mental Health Peer Support Specialist.
 
"Industries across the state are experiencing workforce challenges, but the need is particularly great in behavioral health care, as we need enough trained workers to provide the care that our residents need and deserve," said Governor Maura Healey. "These grants will help address these challenges by hiring and training new talent and upskilling existing talent."  
 
In Berkshire County, the Berkshire County Regional Employment Board, Inc. was awarded $2,227,173.
 
Berkshire County Regional Employment Board will provide training and placement services to prepare 510 unemployed and underemployed participants for Medical Assistant, Certified Nurse Assistant, Acute Care Nurse Assistant, and Registered Behavioral Technician positions. They will partner with Community Health Programs, The Brien Center, Berkshire Health Systems, and Integritus Healthcare. 
 
This partnership also aims to assess the demand and develop programming opportunities for Licensed Practical Nurses, career pathways for Licensed Practical Nurses to Registered Nurses, and provide career advancement training for incumbent Behavioral Health workers.
 
The Workforce Competitive Trust Fund Program grants, administered by Commonwealth Corporation on behalf of the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development, are part of the Healey-Driscoll Administration's strategic investment to retain and upskill existing talent in Massachusetts' current workforce. The Healthcare/Behavioral Health Hub Grants announced today support investments in collaborative efforts focused on addressing healthcare and behavioral health workforce needs in regions across the Commonwealth. 
 
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