DOR: January Revenue Collections

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BOSTON — Massachusetts Department of Revenue (DOR) Commissioner Geoffrey Snyder announced that preliminary revenue collections for January totaled $3.594 billion, $268 million or 6.9 percent less than actual collections in January 2023, and $263 million or 6.8 percent below benchmark.
 
FY2024 year-to-date collections totaled approximately $21.460 billion, which is $212 million or 1 percent less than collections in the same period of FY2023, and $263 million or 1.2 percent less than the year-to-date benchmark.
 
"January collections decreased in income tax withholding, non-withheld income tax, corporate and business tax, and 'all other' tax in comparison to January 2023," said Commissioner Snyder. "These decreases were partially offset by an increase in sales and use tax. The decrease in non-withheld income tax was driven by lower income tax estimated and return payments and an unfavorable increase in income tax refunds. The decrease in withholding was mainly due to typical timing factors in collections. The decrease in corporate and business tax was due to an increase in corporate refunds and a decrease in corporate estimated and return payments. The decrease in 'all other' tax is mostly attributable to a decrease in estate tax, a category that tends to fluctuate."
 
January is a significant month for revenues because many personal income taxpayers are required to make quarterly estimated payments. Historically, roughly 10.2 percent of annual revenue, on average, has been received during January.
 
Details:
 
Income tax collections for January totaled $2.411 billion, $230 million or 8.7 percent below benchmark, and $186 million or 7.2 percent less than January 2023.
 
Withholding tax collections for January totaled $1.526 billion, $49 million or 3.1 percent below benchmark, and $37 million or 2.4 percent less than January 2023.
 
Income tax estimated payments for January totaled $827 million, $165 million or 16.6 percent below benchmark, and $109 million or 11.6 percent less than January 2023.
 
Income tax returns and bills for January totaled $94 million, $14 million or 13.0 percent below benchmark, and $29 million or 23.3 percent less than January 2023.
 
Income tax cash refunds for January totaled $36 million in outflows, $1.2 million or 3.3 percent above benchmark, and $12 million or 47.4 percent more than January 2023.
 
Sales and use tax collections for January totaled $913 million, $8 million or 0.8 percent below benchmark, but $27 million or 3.1 percent more than January 2023.
 
Corporate and business tax collections for January totaled $98 million, $9 million or 8.1 percent below benchmark, and $67 million or 40.5 percent less than January 2023.
 
"All other" tax collections for January totaled $172 million, $18 million or 9.2 percent below benchmark, and $43 million or 19.9 percent less than January 2023.

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West Side Residents Build Ideal Neighborhood At Zoning Session

By Brittany PolitoiBerkshires Staff

Program manager James McGrath opens the session at Conte Community School.

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Residents mapped out a West Side they would like to see during an input session this week, utilizing multi-use properties to create robust density.

Held at Conte Community School on Monday, this was the second meeting of a project to examine zoning in the neighborhood. The Department of Community Development, in partnership with Central Berkshire Habitat for Humanity, has been working with an urban planning and design consulting team on the effort that will conclude on June 30.

"This is a really important project for your neighborhood," Park, Open Space, and Natural Resource Program Manager James McGrath said.

Multifamily houses with spaces to accommodate a small business were popular. A community center, church, year-round farmer's market, and even a place to draw in commerce appeared as elements on the tabletop street.

An emphasis was also placed on the amount of immigrants coming to the area in need of housing.

Max Douhoure, community outreach coordinator for Habitat, explained that he grew up in Africa where people liked to live together, which his build reflected.

"I wanted to improve their conditions," he said. "That’s what I did."

During the first meeting in November, the team heard desires for businesses and commercial uses — including a need for small, family-owned business support. The session provided an overview of what zoning is, what zoning can and can't do, how zoning can improve the community, and the impact on residents.

"Today's exercise is really about creating spaces in buildings and on properties to do a combination of residential [uses] that meet the needs and commercial uses that meet the needs of the neighborhood,"  Emily Keys Innes, principal of Innes Associates explained.

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