Pittsfield Co-op Recognizes Employees for 40 Years of Service

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PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Pittsfield Cooperative Bank (Co-op Bank) recently recognized two employees for 40 years of dedicated service. 
 
Like most long-tenured individuals in financial service institutions, they began as tellers. Both experienced banking before technology became the norm and remember paper processes, applications and documentation.  
 
Janice Acklin began her career as a teller in 1984, the average interest rate for a six-month CD was 12 percent and the average 30-year mortgage was north of 13 percent. After a couple of years, she went to the loan servicing department where a passion for retail lending was developed. In 1995, she was promoted to Assistant Vice President of Retail Lending.
 
"It has been an honor to assist countless individuals and families achieve their dream of home ownership," said Acklin. "Through personalized service, I've fostered long-lasting relationships with my customers."  
 
Kolodziej began her career as a teller in 1984 too, and moved in to the Bank's loan processing department after a few years. Soon after, she became responsible for preparing commitments, sending out forms to attorneys and any other correspondence required in the loan department. In 1994, she was selected to be the executive secretary and clerk of the corporation. She has worked closely with four presidents (Charles Hooker, Albert Reinhardt, Conrad Bernier and J. Jay Anderson) of Co-op Bank as well as a myriad of board of directors over the past thirty years.
 
"It was a tremendous responsibility to be charged with all of the corporate correspondence and documentation for the Bank's senior officers, directors and board," stated Kolodziej. "The clerk of the corporation is nominated and elected at each annual meeting, and it has been a privilege to be in this role for thirty years."
 
When reflecting on the workforce development process of financial services, president and CEO J. Jay Anderson noted that he too began as a bank teller more than thirty years ago before ascending into commercial lending. Remarked Anderson, "This type of well-rounded experience and personal growth was beneficial to the individual and their institution. The knowledge gathered and customer relationships created are critical to the success of the bank."
 
When commenting on Acklin's and Kolodziej's anniversaries, Anderson said, "We are incredibly grateful for Janice's and Vicky's dedication, team-work, passion and service. I know it is not realistic, but Pittsfield Cooperative Bank would love to have them on our team for another forty years."
 
 
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Pittsfield Firefighters Snuff Cellar Blaze

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — Firefighters extinguished a fire in a West Housatonic Street in about 20 minutes. 
 
The blaze started near a dryer but the cause was being investigated.
 
The department responded to the call of smoke in a building at about 12:23 p.m. on Sunday. Upon arrival, firefighters found a light smoke showing from the front and back of the building. 
 
The found an active fire in the basement of the 2 1/2-story, wood-frame structure at 92 West Housatonic, which is being rented as a single-family occupancy.
 
Engine 1 crew advanced a 1 3/4-inch hose to the rear of the building, entered the bulkhead access to the cellar, and conducted suppression activities. Engine 3 crew conducted a primary search of the building. Engine 6 secured a water supply to E1 and Tower 1 ventilated the building. Engine 5 responded as the Rapid
Intervention Team for firefighter safety.
 
The fire was under control and extinguished in 20 minutes. At the time of this writing there were no civilian or firefighter injuries reported. 
 
Fire damage was confined to the laundry area in the cellar with the dryer unit, clothing, and household cleaning supplies sustaining damage. There was minimal smoke damage with the entire building being ventilated in short order.
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