North Adams Holding Forum on Greylock Closure

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NORTH ADAMS, Mass. — The public schools are holding a forum on the closing of Greylock School and the resulting grade configuration for Brayton and Colegrove Park elementary schools. 
 
The forum will be held in person on Wednesday at 6 p.m. at the Brayton Welcome Center and via Zoom link here. Parents and guardians are encouraged to ask questions and provide feedback.
 
School officials are considering an accelerated consolidation of two of the three elementary schools. The School Committee last fall had approved a grade configuration of a prekindergarten through Grade 2 early education program, a Grades 3-6 upper elementary program and a Grades 7-12 middle and high school level. 
 
That decision had been based on the eventual closure of Brayton Elementary after a proposed new $60 million Greylock School is built. However, the failing infrastructure at Greylock and a $2.4 million school budget deficit has officials recommending closing Greylock at the end of this school year. 
 
School officials say a number of factors are being considered in accelerating the closing — declining enrollment, the building's physical condition and, not least of all, a looming $2.4 million budget deficit. Closing Greylock is estimated to save around $1.2 million. 
 
Brayton, built for 550 students now has only 213; Greylock has 315. The enrollment at each school is expected to be 397 at Brayton (assuming a full prekindergarten) and 372 at Colegrove Park, which has a capacity for 420.
 
The consolidation is not expected to increase classroom sizes as the state average is 24 students and the largest for North Adams is about 20. But the reorganization is expected to result in the elimination of about 22 positions, although the administration is recommending adding a STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) specialist for each school.
 
Officials say the pros for closing Greylock now and setting up early education at Brayton and Grades 3-6 at Colegrove Park Elementary would allow for consolidating special education and programming at the grade appropriate schools, creating a familiar cohort for students as they transition through the school system and opening up opportunities for enhanced programming within each school. It would also remove children from an expected construction site.

Tags: brayton/greylock project,   NAPS,   public forum,   

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Hundreds Still Without Power in North County, Stamford


A new pole is in place for a transformer on Main Road in Stamford. 

Update: The National Weather Service in Albany, N.Y., has issued another severe thunderstorm watch until 8 p.m. for Berkshire County, eastern New York and Southern Vermont. 

STAMFORD, Vt. — Nearly 18 hours after severe thunderstorms pummeled the region, hundreds of customers are without power. 

 
The latest update estimates is that power will be back on at 2 p.m. in North Berkshire. Green Mountain Power's outage map could not provide an estimate on power restoration.  
 
Many residents woke up to the sounds of chainsaws and generators on Wednesday morning as clean up from the storm continued.
 
Stamford was hit hard with trees blocking roads and broken utility poles. Some 499 customers in Stamford and Readsboro were without power.
 
A post from Stamford's emergency management director said conditions in North Berkshire were delaying power re-energizing in the Vermont town because it's sourced from National Grid in Massachusetts. 
 
More than 800 customers were without power in Williamstown, Mass., as noon approached. Tree and lines down along Main Street had taken hours for National Grid crews to address and hampered their ability to aid smaller outages in nearby communities. 
 
Williamstown Police posted on Facebook that because of the extensive damage to the electrical supply lines to town, parts of Williamstown may not see power until later tonight or possibly tomorrow.
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