Clark Art Free Pride Month Tour

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WILLIAMSTOWN, Mass. — On Sunday, June 2, the Clark Art Institute offers a special free event, "Queering the Clark's Collection," in celebration of Pride Month. 
 
A Clark educator leads a guided tour of the permanent collection, and together educator and guests contemplate questions like "What makes an artwork queer?" and "How does our understanding of queerness today shape how we understand the identities and lives of artists in the past?"
 
Free with gallery admission. Capacity is limited. Pick up a ticket at the Clark Center Admissions desk, available on a first-come, first-served basis. Meet in the Museum Pavilion at 11:15 am. 

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Pittsfield Council Passes $216M Budget, Cuts Schools

By Brittany PolitoiBerkshires Staff

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — The City Council closed budget season just before 10 p.m. on Tuesday, approving a $216 million spending plan for fiscal year 2025. This includes a cut to the School Department.

Councilors approved a $215,955,210 spending plan that is a 5 percent increase from this year and includes a $200,000 reduction to the $82 million Pittsfield Public School budget. The budget passed 10-1 with Ward 2 Councilor Brittany Noto in opposition.

All conversation was related to the schools, as droves of staff members came to council chambers believing this was a direct slash to positions. It was agreed that misinformation sparked the uprising and was attributed to a "divide" between the school district and the council.

"The amount of misinformation that happened, I don't want to dig into how it happened but it is concerning," Ward 6 Councilor Dina Lampiasi said.

"And when I look at the emails that I received over the last several days from parents and people who are in the School Department, it's apparent to me that there is a divide here and there are a lot of people that agree with us that something isn't working."

Councilor at Large Earl Persip III emphasized that there should be a focus on communication — noting that Superintendent Joseph Curtis has communicated more than previous holders of his title.

"I think there is something missing from what you guys have said to us and from what we hear and that's where we struggle," he said.

Curtis maintained that a staff email he sent out was purely informational and did not make unsound claims, noting that "certainly this was an incredibly complex budget season." The FY25 spending plan includes the reduction of 53 positions, some related to the sunsetting of Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief funds.

"There was no negativity put forward," he said. "There was a recounting of what happened and some possible next steps in the process because I feel it's incredibly important for the school community to know the process."

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