New Marlborough Woman Was Stabbed to Death

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PITTSFIELD - A New Marlborough man has been charged in the murder of 55-year-old mother, Donna Agar.

Agar was stabbed to death, according to an autopsy conducted Tuesday in Holyoke by Associate Medical Examiner Dr. Andrew Sexton.

Rodney M. Ball, 35, of Clark Way, New Marlborough, was arraigned Monday morning in Southern Berkshire District Court in Great Barrington on one count of murder.

A not-guilty plea was entered on his behalf and Judge James McElroy ordered he be held without bail at the Berkshire County House of Correction. A pretrial hearing has been set for April 24.

According to Berkshire County District Attorney David F. Capeless, at about 1:30 Sunday afternoon, state troopers from the Lee barracks received a call to conduct a well-being check at Agar's home at 1660 Clayton Mill River Road, Southfield. When troopers arrived, they discovered her body in a pool of blood. 

Agar "died from multiple sharp force trauma resulting in loss of blood," according to preliminary autopsy results released by the Capeless' office.

According to court documents, Ball told state police that Agar committed suicide by stabbing herself in the neck with a knife.




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The investigation is being conducted by members of the New Marlborough and Sheffield police departments, state police detectives assigned to the district attorney's office, troopers assigned to the Lee barracks and state police Crime Scene Services.

Another New Marlborough resident, William S. Demagall, 24, is serving 25 years to life for the 2006 murder of George Mancini of Hillsdale, N.Y. New Marlborough has less than 1,500 residents.

Updated on March 17, 2008, at 1:55 p.m.;  March 18, 2008,  at 5:15 p.m.
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Letter: Playing Ukraine National Anthem at Tanglewood on Parade Was Bad Idea

Letter to the Editor

To the Editor:

As recently reported by The Eagle in a piece by Clarence Fanto, at Tanglewood on Parade, the Ukrainian national anthem was played. Many in the shed and the lawn stood up in support. While I would certainly concede that Russia is the worst of the two countries in terms of human rights abuses, Ukraine has many despicable aspects to it of which I am highly confident almost all the people standing were ignorant.

Boston Pops conductor Thomas Wilkins said, "The Boston Pops and the Boston Symphony stands with the people of Ukraine, and salutes all who stand for democracy and against injustice, and are willing to sacrifice everything for their freedom." Ironically, Mr. Wilkins also made reference to the rights of the Ukrainian people to have self-determination.

Let me explain why I used the word "ironic." While most Americans do not know it, the present government of Ukraine obtained power by a violent coup in 2014. The Revolution of Dignity, also known as the Maidan Revolution, took place in Ukraine in February 2014 at the end of the Euromaidan protests, when a series of violent events involving protesters, riot police, and unknown shooters in the Ukrainian capital Kyiv culminated in the ousting of elected President Viktor Yanukovych and the overthrow of the Ukrainian government. In a Cato piece titled, "America's Ukraine Hypocrisy," Ted Galen Carpenter writes: "Despite his leadership defects and character flaws, Yanukovych had been duly elected in balloting that international observers considered reasonably free and fair — about the best standard one can hope for outside the mature Western democracies."

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